The meaning of post-apartheid Zulu media

 

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dc.contributor.author Ndlovu, Musa
dc.date.accessioned 2016-11-16T14:12:57Z
dc.date.available 2016-11-16T14:12:57Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02500167.2011.604172
dc.identifier.citation Ndlovu, M. (2011). The meaning of post-apartheid Zulu media. Communicatio, 37(2), 268-290.
dc.identifier.issn 0250-0167
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22569
dc.identifier.uri http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02500167.2011.604172
dc.description.abstract This article explores the relationship between certain South African media corporations, growing post-apartheid Zulu media platforms, the size and diversity of Zulu-speaking media consumers, and the historical socio-cultural construction of ‘Zuluness’. This relationship, this author observes, manifests largely through media corporations’ increasing recognition of Zulu people's pride in Zulu (i.e. the language) and ‘Zuluness’ – all of which are historical products of various forms of socialisation. Coopting this pride, profit-driven media corporations are commodifying Zulu and ‘Zuluness’. This commodification via the establishment of Zulu media outlets is paradoxical: 1) it is a transformation of a public and open Zulu cultural sense of ‘being’ into institutionally determined commodities exchangeable for revenue, for the ultimate benefit of media owners other than the masses of Zulus themselves; 2) it is a form of commoditisation that gives Zulu a linguistic profile that has historically been accorded only to English and Afrikaans. This article's argument is further briefly articulated through various intellectual frames: Graham Murdoch and Peter Golding's conceptualisation of critical political economy of communications and culture (2005); John and Jean Comaroff's anthropological analysis of commercialisation of ethnicity (2009); and, for South African specificity and precedent, through Herman Wasserman's reading of Afrikaans media corporations’ commercialisation of Afrikaans language and identity. Then the question is: What does the explored relationship mean for South Africa's multilingualism?
dc.language.iso eng
dc.source Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research
dc.source.uri http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rcsa20/current
dc.subject.other multilingualism
dc.subject.other Zulu
dc.subject.other Zuluness
dc.title The meaning of post-apartheid Zulu media
dc.type Journal Article
dc.date.updated 2016-01-07T10:33:00Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Film and Media Studies en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Ndlovu, M. (2011). The meaning of post-apartheid Zulu media. <i>Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22569 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Ndlovu, Musa "The meaning of post-apartheid Zulu media." <i>Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research</i> (2011) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22569 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Ndlovu M. The meaning of post-apartheid Zulu media. Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research. 2011; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22569. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Ndlovu, Musa AB - This article explores the relationship between certain South African media corporations, growing post-apartheid Zulu media platforms, the size and diversity of Zulu-speaking media consumers, and the historical socio-cultural construction of ‘Zuluness’. This relationship, this author observes, manifests largely through media corporations’ increasing recognition of Zulu people's pride in Zulu (i.e. the language) and ‘Zuluness’ – all of which are historical products of various forms of socialisation. Coopting this pride, profit-driven media corporations are commodifying Zulu and ‘Zuluness’. This commodification via the establishment of Zulu media outlets is paradoxical: 1) it is a transformation of a public and open Zulu cultural sense of ‘being’ into institutionally determined commodities exchangeable for revenue, for the ultimate benefit of media owners other than the masses of Zulus themselves; 2) it is a form of commoditisation that gives Zulu a linguistic profile that has historically been accorded only to English and Afrikaans. This article's argument is further briefly articulated through various intellectual frames: Graham Murdoch and Peter Golding's conceptualisation of critical political economy of communications and culture (2005); John and Jean Comaroff's anthropological analysis of commercialisation of ethnicity (2009); and, for South African specificity and precedent, through Herman Wasserman's reading of Afrikaans media corporations’ commercialisation of Afrikaans language and identity. Then the question is: What does the explored relationship mean for South Africa's multilingualism? DA - 2011 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2011 SM - 0250-0167 T1 - The meaning of post-apartheid Zulu media TI - The meaning of post-apartheid Zulu media UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22569 ER - en_ZA


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