Mapping Hostilities: The Geography of Xenophobia in Southern Africa

 

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dc.contributor.author Crush, J
dc.contributor.author Pendleton, W
dc.date.accessioned 2016-11-15T09:06:44Z
dc.date.available 2016-11-15T09:06:44Z
dc.date.issued 2007
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03736245.2007.9713874
dc.identifier.citation Crush, J., & Pendleton, W. (2007). Mapping hostilities: the geography of xenophobia, in Southern Africa. South African Geographical Journal= Suid-Afrikaanse Geografiese Tydskrif, 89(1), 64-82.
dc.identifier.issn 0373-6245
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22531
dc.description.abstract The negative attitudes of South Africans towards non-citizens, migrants and refugees are now well-documented. However, since anti-immigrant intolerance is a global phenomenon, should South Africans be singled out? This paper seeks to contextualize the South African situation by comparing the attitudes of South Africans with citizens from several other countries in the Southern African region; namely, Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland and Zimbabwe. The paper is based on a survey implemented in 2001–2 called the National Immigration Policy Survey (NIPS). The survey was designed to measure citizen knowledge of migration and attitudes towards citizenship and foreign citizens including migrants, immigrants and refugees. The survey found that citizens across the region consistently tend to exaggerate the numbers of non-citizens in their countries, to view the migration of people within the region as a “problem” rather than an opportunity, and to scapegoat non-citizens. The intensity of these feelings varies significantly from country to country. The harshest sentiments are expressed by the citizens of South Africa, Namibia and, to a lesser extent, Boswana.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis
dc.source South African Geographical Journal
dc.source.uri http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsag20/current
dc.title Mapping Hostilities: The Geography of Xenophobia in Southern Africa
dc.type Journal Article
dc.date.updated 2016-01-13T08:06:12Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Environmental and Geographical Science en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Crush, J., & Pendleton, W. (2007). Mapping Hostilities: The Geography of Xenophobia in Southern Africa. <i>South African Geographical Journal</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22531 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Crush, J, and W Pendleton "Mapping Hostilities: The Geography of Xenophobia in Southern Africa." <i>South African Geographical Journal</i> (2007) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22531 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Crush J, Pendleton W. Mapping Hostilities: The Geography of Xenophobia in Southern Africa. South African Geographical Journal. 2007; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22531. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Crush, J AU - Pendleton, W AB - The negative attitudes of South Africans towards non-citizens, migrants and refugees are now well-documented. However, since anti-immigrant intolerance is a global phenomenon, should South Africans be singled out? This paper seeks to contextualize the South African situation by comparing the attitudes of South Africans with citizens from several other countries in the Southern African region; namely, Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland and Zimbabwe. The paper is based on a survey implemented in 2001–2 called the National Immigration Policy Survey (NIPS). The survey was designed to measure citizen knowledge of migration and attitudes towards citizenship and foreign citizens including migrants, immigrants and refugees. The survey found that citizens across the region consistently tend to exaggerate the numbers of non-citizens in their countries, to view the migration of people within the region as a “problem” rather than an opportunity, and to scapegoat non-citizens. The intensity of these feelings varies significantly from country to country. The harshest sentiments are expressed by the citizens of South Africa, Namibia and, to a lesser extent, Boswana. DA - 2007 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - South African Geographical Journal LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2007 SM - 0373-6245 T1 - Mapping Hostilities: The Geography of Xenophobia in Southern Africa TI - Mapping Hostilities: The Geography of Xenophobia in Southern Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22531 ER - en_ZA


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