A study and evaluation of client dropout at a drug counsellling centre in Cape Town

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Isaacs, Gordon en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Rogers, Catherine Anne en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-11-14T06:53:05Z
dc.date.available 2016-11-14T06:53:05Z
dc.date.issued 1990 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Rogers, C. 1990. A study and evaluation of client dropout at a drug counsellling centre in Cape Town. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22512
dc.description.abstract This study is motivated by the fact that half the clients attending a drug counselling centre in Cape Town, dropped out of treatment before the fourth interview. The study examines and describes the factors which contribute towards this dropout behaviour. Literature describing dropout behaviour and patterns of illicit drug abuse identified multiple factors influencing dropout behaviour. The present study utilizes four such categories: a) motivation factors, which include the pressure that families or employers exert on clients to attend treatment; b) client factors, including aspects of demography, symptomology and personality; c) treatment factors, such as evaluation methods, the initial contact, client expectations of the agency and treatment effectiveness; and d) therapist factors including therapist attributes, contracting and response to dropout behaviour. In order to explore factors contributing to dropout behaviour, an initial sample of 32 subjects was selected of which fourteen were interviewed by means of a structured questionnaire. An analysis of the results gives rise to the following important findings: Families do not influence the dropout to continue with treatment. Dropouts tend to have unrealistic treatment expectations, such as immediate medical relief from drug related symptoms. Dropouts also tend to have lower educational status and are more frequently employed in relation to the average client. The dropouts experience anxiety during the initial contact, which is often met by uncaring therapist attitudes. Finally, the study demonstrates that inflexible agency hours and a lack of therapist contracting also contribute toward dropout behaviour. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Clinical Social Work en_ZA
dc.title A study and evaluation of client dropout at a drug counsellling centre in Cape Town en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Social Development en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSocSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Rogers, C. A. (1990). <i>A study and evaluation of client dropout at a drug counsellling centre in Cape Town</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Social Development. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22512 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Rogers, Catherine Anne. <i>"A study and evaluation of client dropout at a drug counsellling centre in Cape Town."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Social Development, 1990. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22512 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Rogers CA. A study and evaluation of client dropout at a drug counsellling centre in Cape Town. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Social Development, 1990 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22512 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Rogers, Catherine Anne AB - This study is motivated by the fact that half the clients attending a drug counselling centre in Cape Town, dropped out of treatment before the fourth interview. The study examines and describes the factors which contribute towards this dropout behaviour. Literature describing dropout behaviour and patterns of illicit drug abuse identified multiple factors influencing dropout behaviour. The present study utilizes four such categories: a) motivation factors, which include the pressure that families or employers exert on clients to attend treatment; b) client factors, including aspects of demography, symptomology and personality; c) treatment factors, such as evaluation methods, the initial contact, client expectations of the agency and treatment effectiveness; and d) therapist factors including therapist attributes, contracting and response to dropout behaviour. In order to explore factors contributing to dropout behaviour, an initial sample of 32 subjects was selected of which fourteen were interviewed by means of a structured questionnaire. An analysis of the results gives rise to the following important findings: Families do not influence the dropout to continue with treatment. Dropouts tend to have unrealistic treatment expectations, such as immediate medical relief from drug related symptoms. Dropouts also tend to have lower educational status and are more frequently employed in relation to the average client. The dropouts experience anxiety during the initial contact, which is often met by uncaring therapist attitudes. Finally, the study demonstrates that inflexible agency hours and a lack of therapist contracting also contribute toward dropout behaviour. DA - 1990 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1990 T1 - A study and evaluation of client dropout at a drug counsellling centre in Cape Town TI - A study and evaluation of client dropout at a drug counsellling centre in Cape Town UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22512 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record