After a Decade of Growth in Africa, Little Change in Poverty at the Grassroots

 

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dc.contributor.author Dulani, Boniface
dc.contributor.author Mattes, Robert
dc.contributor.author Logan, Carolyn
dc.date.accessioned 2016-11-07T10:13:34Z
dc.date.available 2016-11-07T10:13:34Z
dc.date.issued 2013-10
dc.identifier.citation Dulani, B., Mattes, R. & Logan, C. (2013). After a Decade of Growth in Africa, Little Change in Poverty at the Grassroots. Afrobarometer Policy No. 1. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22426
dc.description.abstract New data from Round 5 of the Afrobarometer, collected across an unprecedented 34 African countries between October 2011 and June 2013,1 demonstrates that “lived poverty” remains pervasive across the continent. This data, based on the views and experiences of ordinary citizens, counters projections of declining poverty rates that have been derived from official GDP growth rates. For the 16 countries where these questions have been asked over the past decade, we find little evidence for systematic reduction of lived poverty despite average GDP growth rates of 4.8% per year2 over the same period. While we do see reductions in five countries (Cape Verde, Ghana, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe), we also find increases in lived poverty in five others (Botswana, Mali, Senegal, South Africa and Tanzania). Overall, then, despite high reported growth rates, lived poverty at the grassroots remains little changed. This suggests either that growth is occurring, but that its effects are not trickling down to the poorest citizens (in fact, income inequality may be worsening), or alternatively, that actual growth rates may not match up to those being reported. The evidence also suggests, however, that investments in infrastructure and social services are strongly linked with lower levels of lived poverty. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.title After a Decade of Growth in Africa, Little Change in Poverty at the Grassroots en_ZA
dc.type Policy Brief en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Policy brief en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Political Studies en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Dulani, B., Mattes, R., & Logan, C. (2013). <i>After a Decade of Growth in Africa, Little Change in Poverty at the Grassroots</i> University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Political Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22426 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Dulani, Boniface, Robert Mattes, and Carolyn Logan <i>After a Decade of Growth in Africa, Little Change in Poverty at the Grassroots.</i> University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Political Studies, 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22426 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Dulani B, Mattes R, Logan C. After a Decade of Growth in Africa, Little Change in Poverty at the Grassroots. 2013 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22426 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Policy Brief AU - Dulani, Boniface AU - Mattes, Robert AU - Logan, Carolyn AB - New data from Round 5 of the Afrobarometer, collected across an unprecedented 34 African countries between October 2011 and June 2013,1 demonstrates that “lived poverty” remains pervasive across the continent. This data, based on the views and experiences of ordinary citizens, counters projections of declining poverty rates that have been derived from official GDP growth rates. For the 16 countries where these questions have been asked over the past decade, we find little evidence for systematic reduction of lived poverty despite average GDP growth rates of 4.8% per year2 over the same period. While we do see reductions in five countries (Cape Verde, Ghana, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe), we also find increases in lived poverty in five others (Botswana, Mali, Senegal, South Africa and Tanzania). Overall, then, despite high reported growth rates, lived poverty at the grassroots remains little changed. This suggests either that growth is occurring, but that its effects are not trickling down to the poorest citizens (in fact, income inequality may be worsening), or alternatively, that actual growth rates may not match up to those being reported. The evidence also suggests, however, that investments in infrastructure and social services are strongly linked with lower levels of lived poverty. DA - 2013-10 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - After a Decade of Growth in Africa, Little Change in Poverty at the Grassroots TI - After a Decade of Growth in Africa, Little Change in Poverty at the Grassroots UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22426 ER - en_ZA


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