New experiments and a model-driven approach for interpreting Middle Stone Age Lithic Point Function using the Edge Damage Distribution Method

 

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dc.contributor.author Schoville, Benjamin J en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Brown, Kyle S en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Harris, Jacob A en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Wilkins, Jayne en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-31T07:40:08Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-31T07:40:08Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Schoville, B. J., Brown, K. S., Harris, J. A., & Wilkins, J. (2016). New Experiments and a Model-Driven Approach for Interpreting Middle Stone Age Lithic Point Function Using the Edge Damage Distribution Method. PloS one, 11(10), e0164088. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0164088 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0164088 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22369
dc.description.abstract The Middle Stone Age (MSA) is associated with early evidence for symbolic material culture and complex technological innovations. However, one of the most visible aspects of MSA technologies are unretouched triangular stone points that appear in the archaeological record as early as 500,000 years ago in Africa and persist throughout the MSA. How these tools were being used and discarded across a changing Pleistocene landscape can provide insight into how MSA populations prioritized technological and foraging decisions. Creating inferential links between experimental and archaeological tool use helps to establish prehistoric tool function, but is complicated by the overlaying of post-depositional damage onto behaviorally worn tools. Taphonomic damage patterning can provide insight into site formation history, but may preclude behavioral interpretations of tool function. Here, multiple experimental processes that form edge damage on unretouched lithic points from taphonomic and behavioral processes are presented. These provide experimental distributions of wear on tool edges from known processes that are then quantitatively compared to the archaeological patterning of stone point edge damage from three MSA lithic assemblages--Kathu Pan 1, Pinnacle Point Cave 13B, and Die Kelders Cave 1. By using a model-fitting approach, the results presented here provide evidence for variable MSA behavioral strategies of stone point utilization on the landscape consistent with armature tips at KP1, and cutting tools at PP13B and DK1, as well as damage contributions from post-depositional sources across assemblages. This study provides a method with which landscape-scale questions of early modern human tool-use and site-use can be addressed. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en_ZA
dc.rights This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 en_ZA
dc.source PLoS One en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://journals.plos.org/plosone en_ZA
dc.subject.other Archaeology en_ZA
dc.subject.other Paleoanthropology en_ZA
dc.subject.other Experimental archaeology en_ZA
dc.subject.other Taphonomy en_ZA
dc.subject.other Historical archaeology en_ZA
dc.subject.other Behavior en_ZA
dc.subject.other Cattle en_ZA
dc.subject.other Statistical distributions en_ZA
dc.title New experiments and a model-driven approach for interpreting Middle Stone Age Lithic Point Function using the Edge Damage Distribution Method en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.rights.holder © 2016 Schoville et al en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Archaeology en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Schoville, B. J., Brown, K. S., Harris, J. A., & Wilkins, J. (2016). New experiments and a model-driven approach for interpreting Middle Stone Age Lithic Point Function using the Edge Damage Distribution Method. <i>PLoS One</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22369 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Schoville, Benjamin J, Kyle S Brown, Jacob A Harris, and Jayne Wilkins "New experiments and a model-driven approach for interpreting Middle Stone Age Lithic Point Function using the Edge Damage Distribution Method." <i>PLoS One</i> (2016) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22369 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Schoville BJ, Brown KS, Harris JA, Wilkins J. New experiments and a model-driven approach for interpreting Middle Stone Age Lithic Point Function using the Edge Damage Distribution Method. PLoS One. 2016; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22369. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Schoville, Benjamin J AU - Brown, Kyle S AU - Harris, Jacob A AU - Wilkins, Jayne AB - The Middle Stone Age (MSA) is associated with early evidence for symbolic material culture and complex technological innovations. However, one of the most visible aspects of MSA technologies are unretouched triangular stone points that appear in the archaeological record as early as 500,000 years ago in Africa and persist throughout the MSA. How these tools were being used and discarded across a changing Pleistocene landscape can provide insight into how MSA populations prioritized technological and foraging decisions. Creating inferential links between experimental and archaeological tool use helps to establish prehistoric tool function, but is complicated by the overlaying of post-depositional damage onto behaviorally worn tools. Taphonomic damage patterning can provide insight into site formation history, but may preclude behavioral interpretations of tool function. Here, multiple experimental processes that form edge damage on unretouched lithic points from taphonomic and behavioral processes are presented. These provide experimental distributions of wear on tool edges from known processes that are then quantitatively compared to the archaeological patterning of stone point edge damage from three MSA lithic assemblages--Kathu Pan 1, Pinnacle Point Cave 13B, and Die Kelders Cave 1. By using a model-fitting approach, the results presented here provide evidence for variable MSA behavioral strategies of stone point utilization on the landscape consistent with armature tips at KP1, and cutting tools at PP13B and DK1, as well as damage contributions from post-depositional sources across assemblages. This study provides a method with which landscape-scale questions of early modern human tool-use and site-use can be addressed. DA - 2016 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0164088 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - PLoS One LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 T1 - New experiments and a model-driven approach for interpreting Middle Stone Age Lithic Point Function using the Edge Damage Distribution Method TI - New experiments and a model-driven approach for interpreting Middle Stone Age Lithic Point Function using the Edge Damage Distribution Method UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22369 ER - en_ZA


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This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.