The nature and significance of bride wealth among the South African Bantu

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Schapera, Isaac en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Simons, H J en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Hammond-Tooke, William David en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-24T03:45:27Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-24T03:45:27Z
dc.date.issued 1948 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Hammond-Tooke, W. 1948. The nature and significance of bride wealth among the South African Bantu. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22263
dc.description.abstract Perhaps the most controversial topic in the whole field of South African Bantu ethnography is that of the institution known variously as lobola (Zulu-Xhosa), bohadi, boxadi, bohali (Sotho) or mala (Venda). In its simplest form it can be defined as the handing over of some consideration, usually cattle, by the father of the bridegroom to the father of the bride on the occasion of a marriage between their children. No subject has been so widely discussed nor, unfortunately, given rise to so many misconceptions in missionary, administrative and lay circles, and it is imperative that some scientific investigation be made to ascertain, as accurately as possible, the exact nature of this institution and its significance in Bantu society. A glance at the literature shows that this topic has certainly not remained unnoticed by travellers, missionaries and others who have come into contact with our native peoples, either professionally or otherwise, but many of their observations are vitiated by prejudice and such subjective evaluations as: "The individual woman is less than a human being, she is merely a channel through which the children are delivered to the purchaser. It is truly not woman purchase, it is a wholesale transaction in child-life.", and the use of such terms as "sale" and "wife barter". Others say it plays an important stabilising part in native marriage. Thus in all contact situations, but particularly in the native Church and in the law courts, there is marked perplexity - and inconsistency - in dealing with the custom, all tending to increase the confusion and maladjustment of our native peoples - especially among native Christians. It is submitted, therefore, that the time is propitious for a detailed study of this institution, and this the following thesis attempts to do. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Ethnography en_ZA
dc.subject.other Social Anthropology en_ZA
dc.title The nature and significance of bride wealth among the South African Bantu en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Social Anthropology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Hammond-Tooke, W. D. (1948). <i>The nature and significance of bride wealth among the South African Bantu</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Social Anthropology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22263 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Hammond-Tooke, William David. <i>"The nature and significance of bride wealth among the South African Bantu."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Social Anthropology, 1948. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22263 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Hammond-Tooke WD. The nature and significance of bride wealth among the South African Bantu. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Social Anthropology, 1948 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22263 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Hammond-Tooke, William David AB - Perhaps the most controversial topic in the whole field of South African Bantu ethnography is that of the institution known variously as lobola (Zulu-Xhosa), bohadi, boxadi, bohali (Sotho) or mala (Venda). In its simplest form it can be defined as the handing over of some consideration, usually cattle, by the father of the bridegroom to the father of the bride on the occasion of a marriage between their children. No subject has been so widely discussed nor, unfortunately, given rise to so many misconceptions in missionary, administrative and lay circles, and it is imperative that some scientific investigation be made to ascertain, as accurately as possible, the exact nature of this institution and its significance in Bantu society. A glance at the literature shows that this topic has certainly not remained unnoticed by travellers, missionaries and others who have come into contact with our native peoples, either professionally or otherwise, but many of their observations are vitiated by prejudice and such subjective evaluations as: "The individual woman is less than a human being, she is merely a channel through which the children are delivered to the purchaser. It is truly not woman purchase, it is a wholesale transaction in child-life.", and the use of such terms as "sale" and "wife barter". Others say it plays an important stabilising part in native marriage. Thus in all contact situations, but particularly in the native Church and in the law courts, there is marked perplexity - and inconsistency - in dealing with the custom, all tending to increase the confusion and maladjustment of our native peoples - especially among native Christians. It is submitted, therefore, that the time is propitious for a detailed study of this institution, and this the following thesis attempts to do. DA - 1948 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1948 T1 - The nature and significance of bride wealth among the South African Bantu TI - The nature and significance of bride wealth among the South African Bantu UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22263 ER - en_ZA


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