The new SAAO infrared photometric standards based on the E regions

 

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dc.contributor.author Carter, Brian Stuart en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-20T03:37:20Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-20T03:37:20Z
dc.date.issued 1984 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Carter, B. 1984. The new SAAO infrared photometric standards based on the E regions. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22220
dc.description.abstract Since 1974, when the Glass standards were published, four other infrared groups have been set up at the other main southern observatories, i.e. the two Australian observatories, Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatory CMSO) and Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO) and the two observatories in Chile, European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (which uses the California Institute of Technology standard system) (CIT). Unfortunately there has been a serious lack of conformity. Each group has used a different set of filters and has different zero points. No standards are common to all the groups and only a few are in common between any of the systems. Several transformat1ons between the various systems have recently been published (Elias et al 1983 and Glass 1983) but the large errors in the transformation equations show the need for more accurate standard stars. Therefore, on the surface, the introduction by us of a new set of standards would appear in danger of adding confusion to the issue, but this is not, in fact, the case. Firstly, the new set is basically the same system as tha Glass standards but with greatly increased accuracy. Secondly, the work involved has shown up several anomalies and inaccuracies in other systems. Thirdly, this work has shown why such large errors are apparent when comparing the various sets of standards and where the causes probably lie. The observations for these new standards were started in August 1979. The standards were introduced at the SAAO at the beginning of March 1984. The set is likely to evolve with time, increase in number of stars and improve in accuracy. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Astronomy en_ZA
dc.title The new SAAO infrared photometric standards based on the E regions en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Astronomy en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Carter, B. S. (1984). <i>The new SAAO infrared photometric standards based on the E regions</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Astronomy. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22220 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Carter, Brian Stuart. <i>"The new SAAO infrared photometric standards based on the E regions."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Astronomy, 1984. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22220 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Carter BS. The new SAAO infrared photometric standards based on the E regions. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Astronomy, 1984 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22220 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Carter, Brian Stuart AB - Since 1974, when the Glass standards were published, four other infrared groups have been set up at the other main southern observatories, i.e. the two Australian observatories, Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatory CMSO) and Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO) and the two observatories in Chile, European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (which uses the California Institute of Technology standard system) (CIT). Unfortunately there has been a serious lack of conformity. Each group has used a different set of filters and has different zero points. No standards are common to all the groups and only a few are in common between any of the systems. Several transformat1ons between the various systems have recently been published (Elias et al 1983 and Glass 1983) but the large errors in the transformation equations show the need for more accurate standard stars. Therefore, on the surface, the introduction by us of a new set of standards would appear in danger of adding confusion to the issue, but this is not, in fact, the case. Firstly, the new set is basically the same system as tha Glass standards but with greatly increased accuracy. Secondly, the work involved has shown up several anomalies and inaccuracies in other systems. Thirdly, this work has shown why such large errors are apparent when comparing the various sets of standards and where the causes probably lie. The observations for these new standards were started in August 1979. The standards were introduced at the SAAO at the beginning of March 1984. The set is likely to evolve with time, increase in number of stars and improve in accuracy. DA - 1984 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1984 T1 - The new SAAO infrared photometric standards based on the E regions TI - The new SAAO infrared photometric standards based on the E regions UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22220 ER - en_ZA


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