Glass ceramics from a South African pulverised fuel ash

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Heckroodt, R O en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Kirby, M J en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-14T06:20:15Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-14T06:20:15Z
dc.date.issued 1991 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Kirby, M. 1991. Glass ceramics from a South African pulverised fuel ash. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22118
dc.description Bibliography: pages 92-101. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The generation of electricity by the combustion of pulverised coal produces large quantities of coal ash (PF A). The disposal of this ash lias become a matter of concern due to the unsightly and hazardous nature of the PF A, and it has been the subject of intense investigations into its suitability as a raw material. Many uses have been proposed for the PF A. When used as landfill or mining backfill, the attraction is the low cost of the material. Other uses, as in the concrete industry, use PF A because of the improvements in quality of the resultant product. PF A has been suggested as a raw material for the production of wear resistant materials. The PF A is composed in the main of SiO₂ and AI₂O₃, and is a suitable material for the production of alumino-silicate ceramic materials, which are known to be tough and wear resistant. To establish the suitability of PF A from the Lethabo Power Station as a raw material, a project to prepare glass ceramic materials from the PF A was started. The conversion of the PF A to a glass ceramic material is a complex process involving many stages, and the processing at each stage will affects the final properties of the material. It is not possible in a short project such as this to examine all the factors which exert some control on the process, and so a small subset of these parameters was selected for study, namely the effect of added oxides on the crystallisation behaviour. Glass items which crystallise on holding at high temperatures commonly do so by growth of crystals from the surface of the item. This results in a material that is mechanically weak, due to the highly oriented microstructure that results. Nucleating agents can be used to obviate this. By providing sites for crystal growth in the bulk of the sample, they induce the crystallisation of fine grained ceramics with good mechanical properties. This study examines the effect of TiO₂, P₂O₅, and a mixture of iron and chrome oxides on the crystallisation of the glass prepared using PF A. The effect of these oxides was evaluated by examination of the microstructure of the crystalline specimens, and the kinetics of crystallisation were analysed by fitting data obtained by isothermal crystallisation of the specimens to the Avrami equation. Finally, the mechanical properties of the materials were tested by solid particle erosion, and the materials ranked against a selection of other materials used for their wear resistance. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Civil Engineering en_ZA
dc.title Glass ceramics from a South African pulverised fuel ash en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Department of Civil Engineering en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Kirby, M. J. (1991). <i>Glass ceramics from a South African pulverised fuel ash</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22118 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Kirby, M J. <i>"Glass ceramics from a South African pulverised fuel ash."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering, 1991. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22118 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Kirby MJ. Glass ceramics from a South African pulverised fuel ash. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering, 1991 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22118 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Kirby, M J AB - The generation of electricity by the combustion of pulverised coal produces large quantities of coal ash (PF A). The disposal of this ash lias become a matter of concern due to the unsightly and hazardous nature of the PF A, and it has been the subject of intense investigations into its suitability as a raw material. Many uses have been proposed for the PF A. When used as landfill or mining backfill, the attraction is the low cost of the material. Other uses, as in the concrete industry, use PF A because of the improvements in quality of the resultant product. PF A has been suggested as a raw material for the production of wear resistant materials. The PF A is composed in the main of SiO₂ and AI₂O₃, and is a suitable material for the production of alumino-silicate ceramic materials, which are known to be tough and wear resistant. To establish the suitability of PF A from the Lethabo Power Station as a raw material, a project to prepare glass ceramic materials from the PF A was started. The conversion of the PF A to a glass ceramic material is a complex process involving many stages, and the processing at each stage will affects the final properties of the material. It is not possible in a short project such as this to examine all the factors which exert some control on the process, and so a small subset of these parameters was selected for study, namely the effect of added oxides on the crystallisation behaviour. Glass items which crystallise on holding at high temperatures commonly do so by growth of crystals from the surface of the item. This results in a material that is mechanically weak, due to the highly oriented microstructure that results. Nucleating agents can be used to obviate this. By providing sites for crystal growth in the bulk of the sample, they induce the crystallisation of fine grained ceramics with good mechanical properties. This study examines the effect of TiO₂, P₂O₅, and a mixture of iron and chrome oxides on the crystallisation of the glass prepared using PF A. The effect of these oxides was evaluated by examination of the microstructure of the crystalline specimens, and the kinetics of crystallisation were analysed by fitting data obtained by isothermal crystallisation of the specimens to the Avrami equation. Finally, the mechanical properties of the materials were tested by solid particle erosion, and the materials ranked against a selection of other materials used for their wear resistance. DA - 1991 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1991 T1 - Glass ceramics from a South African pulverised fuel ash TI - Glass ceramics from a South African pulverised fuel ash UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/22118 ER - en_ZA


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