Investigations into the functioning of phytoplankton, zooplankton, kelp and benthic communities at the Prince Edward Islands

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Branch, George M en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Lucas, Michael en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Attwood, Colin Graham en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-20T12:34:47Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-20T12:34:47Z
dc.date.issued 1991 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Attwood, C. 1991. Investigations into the functioning of phytoplankton, zooplankton, kelp and benthic communities at the Prince Edward Islands. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21843
dc.description.abstract Abstract Several questions pertaining to the marine communities at the Prince Edward Islands are addressed. Firstly, the nature of the 'island-mass effect', and the cause of the frequently recorded diatom blooms in the area are examined. It had been suggested that the cause of the blooms is related to the presence of a Taylor Column-induced, low density, stationary eddy which stabilises the water column. On a cruise in April/May 1989, temperature, salinity, nutrients, chlorophyll and primary production were measured at 90 stations in a large grid centred on the islands. These, together with data collected on previous cruises, are used to show that the repeated occurrence of diatom blooms was not a result of nutrient enhancement. No evidence for light-limitation of phytoplankton was found. The evidence and theoretical basis which was used to predict the existence of a Taylor Column is questioned. An alternative hypothesis for explaining the blooms is presented. It is argued that these local blooms are simply the result of seeding by a dormant stock of diatom resting spores from the shallow sediments around the islands. This hypothesis hinges on three observations: (1) the blooms occur only over shallow sediments and are not a feature of the open ocean, (2) the species Chaetoceros radicans has been responsible for the bloom each time the cells were identified, and (3) C. radicans forms a rapidly sinking, heavily silicified, resting spore. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Zoology en_ZA
dc.subject.other Marine Biology en_ZA
dc.title Investigations into the functioning of phytoplankton, zooplankton, kelp and benthic communities at the Prince Edward Islands en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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