The long-term impact of severe head injury on the family

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Dawes, Andrew en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Jordan, Ann en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Richman, Alexandra Elizabeth en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-20T12:33:13Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-20T12:33:13Z
dc.date.issued 1989 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Richman, A. 1989. The long-term impact of severe head injury on the family. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21839
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of brain injury upon the family of the brain-injured patient. Although some research into the psychosocial sequelae following head injury and the direct and indirect effects of severe head-injury upon the family have been conducted, these studies have largely been of a quantitative nature. For this reason, and with a view to expanding upon the existing findings, the present study was qualitative in nature in order to gain an in-depth understanding of relatives' experience of living with and caring for a severely head-injured family member. In addition, ways in which family members coped with the impact of the brain injury were elicited. Participants were caregivers to 11 severely head-injured patients who were representative of a range of socio-economic groupings and racial classifications. Severity of head injury was controlled for and participants were interviewed two or more years after the head injury had occurred. Demographic and injury related data were elicited by means of a questionnaire. Thereafter, data was collected by means of in-depth semi-structured interviews. A number of indices were developed based on a qualitative and descriptive analysis of the data. The study found that the mam source of distress experienced by caregivers related to emotional rather than physical symptomatology. All types of family relationships were profoundly affected by the patient's brain injury, although the caregiver's relationship with the patient appeared most vulnerable. Formal sources of support were considered inadequate and most caregivers relied heavily on emotional support, particularly from an intimate source. Coping responses were dependent upon coping resources available. Families of brain-injured patients who were racially and socio-economically disadvantaged were subjected to additional stress related to the unavailability of services and the randomness with which services that were available were dispensed. Rehabilitation services appeared to be failing to meet the needs of "brain-injured families" (Brooks, 1984) as they concentrated on the patient's physical handicap rather than emotional sequelae of the head injury. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Head - Wounds and injuries - Psychological aspects en_ZA
dc.subject.other Family psychotherapy en_ZA
dc.subject.other Clinical Psychology en_ZA
dc.title The long-term impact of severe head injury on the family en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Richman, A. E. (1989). <i>The long-term impact of severe head injury on the family</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21839 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Richman, Alexandra Elizabeth. <i>"The long-term impact of severe head injury on the family."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 1989. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21839 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Richman AE. The long-term impact of severe head injury on the family. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 1989 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21839 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Richman, Alexandra Elizabeth AB - The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of brain injury upon the family of the brain-injured patient. Although some research into the psychosocial sequelae following head injury and the direct and indirect effects of severe head-injury upon the family have been conducted, these studies have largely been of a quantitative nature. For this reason, and with a view to expanding upon the existing findings, the present study was qualitative in nature in order to gain an in-depth understanding of relatives' experience of living with and caring for a severely head-injured family member. In addition, ways in which family members coped with the impact of the brain injury were elicited. Participants were caregivers to 11 severely head-injured patients who were representative of a range of socio-economic groupings and racial classifications. Severity of head injury was controlled for and participants were interviewed two or more years after the head injury had occurred. Demographic and injury related data were elicited by means of a questionnaire. Thereafter, data was collected by means of in-depth semi-structured interviews. A number of indices were developed based on a qualitative and descriptive analysis of the data. The study found that the mam source of distress experienced by caregivers related to emotional rather than physical symptomatology. All types of family relationships were profoundly affected by the patient's brain injury, although the caregiver's relationship with the patient appeared most vulnerable. Formal sources of support were considered inadequate and most caregivers relied heavily on emotional support, particularly from an intimate source. Coping responses were dependent upon coping resources available. Families of brain-injured patients who were racially and socio-economically disadvantaged were subjected to additional stress related to the unavailability of services and the randomness with which services that were available were dispensed. Rehabilitation services appeared to be failing to meet the needs of "brain-injured families" (Brooks, 1984) as they concentrated on the patient's physical handicap rather than emotional sequelae of the head injury. DA - 1989 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1989 T1 - The long-term impact of severe head injury on the family TI - The long-term impact of severe head injury on the family UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21839 ER - en_ZA


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