Permeability and swell testing of selected South African bentonites

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Scheele, Friedrich en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Orsmond, Wyatt en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-06T14:41:58Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-06T14:41:58Z
dc.date.issued 1997 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Orsmond, W. 1997. Permeability and swell testing of selected South African bentonites. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21687
dc.description Bibliography: pages 141-144. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Bentonite, a natural clay composed predominately of montmorillonite has become a very useful product in Civil Engineering due to its extremely low permeability and high swell potential. Bentonite has been used extensively in countries like the United States of America, Canada and Europe as an impervious liner in dams, landfill sites, retention ponds etc. where it is used in its pure form and as a composite material mixed with soil. Bentonite liners are rapidly gaining interest in many other countries including Southern Africa. Bentonite is found world wide, and in South Africa (RSA) there are three deposits presently being mined namely Heidelburg (Western Cape), Koppies (Orange Free State) and Plettenberg Bay (Eastern Cape). The bentonite from each of these deposits are called Culseal I Culbond, Koppies and Plett respectively. They all vary with regard to chemical composition and little is known about there engineering properties. The aim of this research is to provide information both general and with regard to Civil Engineering on the bentonites presently being mined in South Africa to facilitate design and future research in this field. The triple layer crystalline sheets which make up a bentonite particle are held together by weak forces and exchangeable cations (which dictate the bentonite type). When brought into contact with water, the water is drawn onto the sheets to balance the charges forcing the layers apart resulting in swelling of up to 15 times the original particle thickness. This swollen, hydrated bentonite is almost impervious. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Civil Engineering en_ZA
dc.title Permeability and swell testing of selected South African bentonites en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Department of Civil Engineering en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc (Eng) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Orsmond, W. (1997). <i>Permeability and swell testing of selected South African bentonites</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21687 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Orsmond, Wyatt. <i>"Permeability and swell testing of selected South African bentonites."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering, 1997. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21687 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Orsmond W. Permeability and swell testing of selected South African bentonites. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering, 1997 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21687 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Orsmond, Wyatt AB - Bentonite, a natural clay composed predominately of montmorillonite has become a very useful product in Civil Engineering due to its extremely low permeability and high swell potential. Bentonite has been used extensively in countries like the United States of America, Canada and Europe as an impervious liner in dams, landfill sites, retention ponds etc. where it is used in its pure form and as a composite material mixed with soil. Bentonite liners are rapidly gaining interest in many other countries including Southern Africa. Bentonite is found world wide, and in South Africa (RSA) there are three deposits presently being mined namely Heidelburg (Western Cape), Koppies (Orange Free State) and Plettenberg Bay (Eastern Cape). The bentonite from each of these deposits are called Culseal I Culbond, Koppies and Plett respectively. They all vary with regard to chemical composition and little is known about there engineering properties. The aim of this research is to provide information both general and with regard to Civil Engineering on the bentonites presently being mined in South Africa to facilitate design and future research in this field. The triple layer crystalline sheets which make up a bentonite particle are held together by weak forces and exchangeable cations (which dictate the bentonite type). When brought into contact with water, the water is drawn onto the sheets to balance the charges forcing the layers apart resulting in swelling of up to 15 times the original particle thickness. This swollen, hydrated bentonite is almost impervious. DA - 1997 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1997 T1 - Permeability and swell testing of selected South African bentonites TI - Permeability and swell testing of selected South African bentonites UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21687 ER - en_ZA


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