Slavery in Cape Town, 1806 to 1834

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Worden, Nigel en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Bank, Andrew en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-01T07:11:47Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-01T07:11:47Z
dc.date.issued 1991 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Bank, A. 1991. Slavery in Cape Town, 1806 to 1834. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21623
dc.description.abstract In an influential article on the evolution of Afro-American society on the British mainland of North America, written in 1980, Ira Berlin charged slave historians with having ''produced an essentially static vision of Afro-American life. From Stanley Elkins' Sambo to John W.Blassingame's Nat-Sambo-Jack typology, scholars of all persuasions have held time constant and ignored the influence of place". Contrary to the monolithic presentations of the slave experience in the existing literature, Berlin maintains that at least three regionally distinct North American slave systems emerged in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries: a Northern nonplantation system and two Southern plantation systems (centred respectively on the Carolina/Georgia lowcountry and the Chesapeake). Regional variations in economic and demographic patterns (i.e. the demands of particular staples, the various configurations of whites and blacks, and variations in African-creole ratios) are shown to have underpinned the evolution of distinctive socio-cultural patterns in these three areas. Furthermore, Berlin demonstrates how temporal changes (specifically with regard to the differential impact of the slave trade in the mid-eighteenth century) superimposed themselves upon existing regional variations in shaping the North American slave experience - or, more accurately, experiences. Thus: "no matter how complete recent studies of black life appear, they are limited to the extent that they provide a static and singular vision of a dynamic and complex society". en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Historical Studies en_ZA
dc.title Slavery in Cape Town, 1806 to 1834 en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Historical Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Bank, A. (1991). <i>Slavery in Cape Town, 1806 to 1834</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21623 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Bank, Andrew. <i>"Slavery in Cape Town, 1806 to 1834."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies, 1991. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21623 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Bank A. Slavery in Cape Town, 1806 to 1834. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies, 1991 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21623 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Bank, Andrew AB - In an influential article on the evolution of Afro-American society on the British mainland of North America, written in 1980, Ira Berlin charged slave historians with having ''produced an essentially static vision of Afro-American life. From Stanley Elkins' Sambo to John W.Blassingame's Nat-Sambo-Jack typology, scholars of all persuasions have held time constant and ignored the influence of place". Contrary to the monolithic presentations of the slave experience in the existing literature, Berlin maintains that at least three regionally distinct North American slave systems emerged in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries: a Northern nonplantation system and two Southern plantation systems (centred respectively on the Carolina/Georgia lowcountry and the Chesapeake). Regional variations in economic and demographic patterns (i.e. the demands of particular staples, the various configurations of whites and blacks, and variations in African-creole ratios) are shown to have underpinned the evolution of distinctive socio-cultural patterns in these three areas. Furthermore, Berlin demonstrates how temporal changes (specifically with regard to the differential impact of the slave trade in the mid-eighteenth century) superimposed themselves upon existing regional variations in shaping the North American slave experience - or, more accurately, experiences. Thus: "no matter how complete recent studies of black life appear, they are limited to the extent that they provide a static and singular vision of a dynamic and complex society". DA - 1991 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1991 T1 - Slavery in Cape Town, 1806 to 1834 TI - Slavery in Cape Town, 1806 to 1834 UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21623 ER - en_ZA


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