South African Social Science in the Global HIV/AIDS Knowledge Domain

 

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dc.contributor.author Hodes, Rebecca
dc.contributor.author Morrell, Robert
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-29T13:21:27Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-29T13:21:27Z
dc.date.issued 2016-07
dc.identifier.citation Hodes, R. & Morrell, R. (2016). South African Social Science in the Global HIV/AIDS Knowledge Domain. CSSR Working Paper No. 382. Centre for Social Science Research, University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.isbn 978-1-77011-369-5 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21592
dc.description.abstract Research about HIV constitutes a global domain of academic knowledge. This domain is dominated by biomedicine, and by institutions and funders based in the ‘global North’. However, from the earliest years of the epidemic, African investigators have produced and disseminated knowledge about HIV. Using a ‘Northern’ standard for determining research impact - bibliometrical measures of citation count - we demonstrate how metrics for capturing the impact of knowledge may be repurposed. We explore how the research in this archive may be interpreted as ‘Southern Theory’. Our argument is not based on the geographical location, but instead on epistemological significance. With a focus on South Africa, we situate HIV social science within changing historical contexts, connecting research findings to developments in medicine, health sciences and politics. We focus on two key themes in the evolution of HIV knowledge: (1) The significance of context and locality - the ‘setting’ of HIV research; and (2) sex, race and risk – changing ideas about the social determinants of HIV transmission. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.title South African Social Science in the Global HIV/AIDS Knowledge Domain en_ZA
dc.type Working Paper en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Working paper en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Aids and Society Research Unit en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Hodes, R., & Morrell, R. (2016). <i>South African Social Science in the Global HIV/AIDS Knowledge Domain</i> University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Aids and Society Research Unit. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21592 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Hodes, Rebecca, and Robert Morrell <i>South African Social Science in the Global HIV/AIDS Knowledge Domain.</i> University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Aids and Society Research Unit, 2016. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21592 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Hodes R, Morrell R. South African Social Science in the Global HIV/AIDS Knowledge Domain. 2016 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21592 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Working Paper AU - Hodes, Rebecca AU - Morrell, Robert AB - Research about HIV constitutes a global domain of academic knowledge. This domain is dominated by biomedicine, and by institutions and funders based in the ‘global North’. However, from the earliest years of the epidemic, African investigators have produced and disseminated knowledge about HIV. Using a ‘Northern’ standard for determining research impact - bibliometrical measures of citation count - we demonstrate how metrics for capturing the impact of knowledge may be repurposed. We explore how the research in this archive may be interpreted as ‘Southern Theory’. Our argument is not based on the geographical location, but instead on epistemological significance. With a focus on South Africa, we situate HIV social science within changing historical contexts, connecting research findings to developments in medicine, health sciences and politics. We focus on two key themes in the evolution of HIV knowledge: (1) The significance of context and locality - the ‘setting’ of HIV research; and (2) sex, race and risk – changing ideas about the social determinants of HIV transmission. DA - 2016-07 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 SM - 978-1-77011-369-5 T1 - South African Social Science in the Global HIV/AIDS Knowledge Domain TI - South African Social Science in the Global HIV/AIDS Knowledge Domain UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21592 ER - en_ZA


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)