Patterns of racial segregation in residence dining halls

 

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dc.contributor.author Schrieff, Leigh
dc.contributor.author Tredoux, Colin
dc.contributor.author Dixon, John
dc.contributor.author Finchilescu, Gillian
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-26T11:20:36Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-26T11:20:36Z
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.identifier 10.1177/008124630503500303
dc.identifier.citation Schrieff, L., Tredoux, C., Dixon, J., & Finchilescu, G. (2005). Patterns of racial segregation in university residence dining-halls. South African Journal of Psychology, 35(3), 433-443.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21564
dc.description.abstract Social psychologists have long been interested in the effects of ‘contact’ between racial groups. The conditions under which this contact can manifest have usually been experimentally manipulated in order to determine optimal combinations. A shortcoming of this approach is that it constructs contact situations that are unnatural and contrived. Some researchers have proposed an approach that examines contact as a natural phenomenon (Dixon & Durrheim, 2003). The present research adopts this approach, and reports on a naturalistic, observational study of ‘contact’ between students in university residence dining-halls. Seating patterns of students were observed for one month and analysed along dimensions of spatial variation. The results show high levels of informal segregation and that the segregation manifests as a specifi c spatial confi guration. Such results, which occur despite the presence of apparently favourable conditions, illustrate how this approach may lead to different conclusions to those achieved through experimental manipulation.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.source South African Journal of Psychology
dc.source.uri https://uk.sagepub.com/en-gb/afr/south-african-journal-of-psychology/journal202212
dc.source.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/008124630503500303
dc.subject.other Contact hypothesis
dc.subject.other Residence dining room
dc.subject.other Segregation
dc.subject.other South Africa
dc.title Patterns of racial segregation in residence dining halls
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-01-05T08:24:30Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Research
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Schrieff, L., Tredoux, C., Dixon, J., & Finchilescu, G. (2005). Patterns of racial segregation in residence dining halls. <i>South African Journal of Psychology</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21564 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Schrieff, Leigh, Colin Tredoux, John Dixon, and Gillian Finchilescu "Patterns of racial segregation in residence dining halls." <i>South African Journal of Psychology</i> (2005) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21564 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Schrieff L, Tredoux C, Dixon J, Finchilescu G. Patterns of racial segregation in residence dining halls. South African Journal of Psychology. 2005; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21564. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Schrieff, Leigh AU - Tredoux, Colin AU - Dixon, John AU - Finchilescu, Gillian AB - Social psychologists have long been interested in the effects of ‘contact’ between racial groups. The conditions under which this contact can manifest have usually been experimentally manipulated in order to determine optimal combinations. A shortcoming of this approach is that it constructs contact situations that are unnatural and contrived. Some researchers have proposed an approach that examines contact as a natural phenomenon (Dixon & Durrheim, 2003). The present research adopts this approach, and reports on a naturalistic, observational study of ‘contact’ between students in university residence dining-halls. Seating patterns of students were observed for one month and analysed along dimensions of spatial variation. The results show high levels of informal segregation and that the segregation manifests as a specifi c spatial confi guration. Such results, which occur despite the presence of apparently favourable conditions, illustrate how this approach may lead to different conclusions to those achieved through experimental manipulation. DA - 2005 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - South African Journal of Psychology LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2005 T1 - Patterns of racial segregation in residence dining halls TI - Patterns of racial segregation in residence dining halls UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21564 ER - en_ZA


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