Performance analysis for a shaded-pole linear induction motor

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Gieras, Jacek F en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Davidson, Innocent Ewean Agbongiague en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-18T13:50:28Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-18T13:50:28Z
dc.date.issued 1998 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Davidson, I. 1998. Performance analysis for a shaded-pole linear induction motor. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21326
dc.description Bibliography: pages 129-148. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The induction motor remains the prime mover of present day industry with it's associated components in drive applications. In many such applications, fractional horse-power motors find ready use in small mechanisms where three-phase power supply is not available. In Southern Africa, these motors can be used is rural areas with simple reticulation systems, hence the renewed interest in the development of these low-power electrical motors, especially specialised models such as linear versions of such motors for special applications. This research is in the area of single-phase LIMs. The objective has been to model the shaded-pole LIM, in an attempt to enhance it's performance through improved design methods. This was carried out using an integrated analysis approach, involving circuital and field theory in the analysis of the practical motor, and computer simulation of it's equivalent model using the finite element method. Linear counterparts are possible for all the various forms of rotating electrical machines. All cylindrical machines can be 'cut' along a radial plane and 'unrolled' [32]. LIMs convert electrical energy directly into mechanical energy of translatory motion. Some advantages of linear version of induction motors are: they are gearless and often require minimal material thus minimising cost. While their scope of application are somewhat limited when compared to rotary versions, they do however give excellent performance in special situations where translator motion is required. However, the output power-to-mass and output power-to-volume of active materials ratio is reduced compared to rotary induction motors[45]. These disadvantages are caused by the large air-gap and the open magnetic circuit, which produces parasitical effects. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Electrical Engineering en_ZA
dc.title Performance analysis for a shaded-pole linear induction motor en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Department of Electrical Engineering en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Davidson, I. E. A. (1998). <i>Performance analysis for a shaded-pole linear induction motor</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Electrical Engineering. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21326 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Davidson, Innocent Ewean Agbongiague. <i>"Performance analysis for a shaded-pole linear induction motor."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Electrical Engineering, 1998. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21326 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Davidson IEA. Performance analysis for a shaded-pole linear induction motor. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Electrical Engineering, 1998 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21326 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Davidson, Innocent Ewean Agbongiague AB - The induction motor remains the prime mover of present day industry with it's associated components in drive applications. In many such applications, fractional horse-power motors find ready use in small mechanisms where three-phase power supply is not available. In Southern Africa, these motors can be used is rural areas with simple reticulation systems, hence the renewed interest in the development of these low-power electrical motors, especially specialised models such as linear versions of such motors for special applications. This research is in the area of single-phase LIMs. The objective has been to model the shaded-pole LIM, in an attempt to enhance it's performance through improved design methods. This was carried out using an integrated analysis approach, involving circuital and field theory in the analysis of the practical motor, and computer simulation of it's equivalent model using the finite element method. Linear counterparts are possible for all the various forms of rotating electrical machines. All cylindrical machines can be 'cut' along a radial plane and 'unrolled' [32]. LIMs convert electrical energy directly into mechanical energy of translatory motion. Some advantages of linear version of induction motors are: they are gearless and often require minimal material thus minimising cost. While their scope of application are somewhat limited when compared to rotary versions, they do however give excellent performance in special situations where translator motion is required. However, the output power-to-mass and output power-to-volume of active materials ratio is reduced compared to rotary induction motors[45]. These disadvantages are caused by the large air-gap and the open magnetic circuit, which produces parasitical effects. DA - 1998 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1998 T1 - Performance analysis for a shaded-pole linear induction motor TI - Performance analysis for a shaded-pole linear induction motor UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21326 ER - en_ZA


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