The relationship between transport kinetics and glucose uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic chemostat cultures

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Du Preez, J C
dc.contributor.author De Kock, S H
dc.contributor.author Kilian, S G
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-17T10:33:14Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-17T10:33:14Z
dc.date.issued 2000
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1002744100953
dc.identifier.citation Du Preez, J. C., de Kock, S. H., Kilian, S. G., & Litthauer, D. (2000). The relationship between transport kinetics and glucose uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic chemostat cultures. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, 77(4), 379-388. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 0003-6072 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21294
dc.description.abstract The steady-state residual glucose concentrations in aerobic chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 4126, grown in a complex medium, increased sharply in the respiro-fermentative region, suggesting a large increase in the apparent ks value. By contrast, strain CBS 8066 exhibited much lower steady-state residual glucose concentrations in this region. Glucose transport assays were conducted with these strains to determine the relationship between transport kinetics and sugar assimilation. With strain CBS 8066, a high-affinity glucose uptake system was evident up to a dilution rate of 0.41 h−1, with a low-affinity uptake system and high residual glucose levels only evident at the higher dilution rates. With strain ATCC 4126, the high-affinity uptake system was present up to a dilution rate of about 0.38 h−1, but a low-affinity uptake system was discerned already from a dilution rate of 0.27 h−1, which coincided with the sharp increase in the residual glucose concentration. Neither of the above yeast strains had an absolute vitamin requirement for aerobic growth. Nevertheless, in the same medium supplemented with vitamins, no low-affinity uptake system was evident in cells of strain ATCC 4126 even at high dilution rates and the steady-state residual glucose concentration was much lower. The shift in the relative proportions of the high and low-affinity uptake systems of strain ATCC 4126, which might have been mediated by an inositol deficiency through its effect on the cell membrane, may offer an explanation for the unusually high steady-state residual glucose concentrations observed at dilution rates above 52% of the wash-out dilution rate. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Springer en_ZA
dc.source  Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://link.springer.com/journal/10482
dc.subject.other chemostat
dc.subject.other glucose transport
dc.subject.other inositol
dc.subject.other Saccharomyces cerevisae
dc.title The relationship between transport kinetics and glucose uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic chemostat cultures en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-08-17T09:53:58Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Du Preez, J. C., De Kock, S. H., & Kilian, S. G. (2000). The relationship between transport kinetics and glucose uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic chemostat cultures. <i> Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21294 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Du Preez, J C, S H De Kock, and S G Kilian "The relationship between transport kinetics and glucose uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic chemostat cultures." <i> Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek</i> (2000) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21294 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Du Preez JC, De Kock SH, Kilian SG. The relationship between transport kinetics and glucose uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic chemostat cultures.  Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek. 2000; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21294. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Du Preez, J C AU - De Kock, S H AU - Kilian, S G AB - The steady-state residual glucose concentrations in aerobic chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 4126, grown in a complex medium, increased sharply in the respiro-fermentative region, suggesting a large increase in the apparent ks value. By contrast, strain CBS 8066 exhibited much lower steady-state residual glucose concentrations in this region. Glucose transport assays were conducted with these strains to determine the relationship between transport kinetics and sugar assimilation. With strain CBS 8066, a high-affinity glucose uptake system was evident up to a dilution rate of 0.41 h−1, with a low-affinity uptake system and high residual glucose levels only evident at the higher dilution rates. With strain ATCC 4126, the high-affinity uptake system was present up to a dilution rate of about 0.38 h−1, but a low-affinity uptake system was discerned already from a dilution rate of 0.27 h−1, which coincided with the sharp increase in the residual glucose concentration. Neither of the above yeast strains had an absolute vitamin requirement for aerobic growth. Nevertheless, in the same medium supplemented with vitamins, no low-affinity uptake system was evident in cells of strain ATCC 4126 even at high dilution rates and the steady-state residual glucose concentration was much lower. The shift in the relative proportions of the high and low-affinity uptake systems of strain ATCC 4126, which might have been mediated by an inositol deficiency through its effect on the cell membrane, may offer an explanation for the unusually high steady-state residual glucose concentrations observed at dilution rates above 52% of the wash-out dilution rate. DA - 2000 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 -  Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2000 SM - 0003-6072 T1 - The relationship between transport kinetics and glucose uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic chemostat cultures TI - The relationship between transport kinetics and glucose uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic chemostat cultures UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21294 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record