Advantages and challenges of microalgae as a source of oil for biodiesel

 

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dc.contributor.author Griffiths, M J
dc.contributor.author Dicks, R G
dc.contributor.author Richardson, C
dc.contributor.author Harrison, S T L
dc.contributor.editor Margarita Stoytcheva en_ZA
dc.contributor.editor Gisela Montero en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-17T08:25:08Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-17T08:25:08Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.citation Griffiths, M. J., Dicks, R. G., Richardson, C., & Harrison, S. T. (2011). Advantages and challenges of microalgae as a source of oil for biodiesel. Biodisel–feedstocks and processing technologies, 177-200. en_ZA
dc.identifier.isbn 978-953-307-713-0 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21278
dc.description.abstract Microalgal oil is currently being considered as a promising alternative feedstock for biodiesel. The present demand for oil for biofuel production greatly exceeds the supply, hence alternative sources of biomass are required. Microalgae have several advantages over land-based crops in terms of oil production. Their simple unicellular structure and high photosynthetic efficiency allow for a potentially higher oil yield per area than that of the best oilseed crops. Algae can be grown on marginal land using brackish or salt water and hence do not compete for resources with conventional agriculture. They do not require herbicides or pesticides and their cultivation could be coupled with the uptake of CO2 from industrial waste streams, and the removal of excess nutrients from wastewater (Hodaifa et al., 2008; An et al., 2003). In addition to oil production, potentially valuable co-products such as pigments, antioxidants, nutraceuticals, fertilizer or feeds could be produced (Mata et al., 2010; Rodolfi et al., 2009). en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher InTechOpen en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.intechopen.com/books/biodiesel-feedstocks-and-processing-technologies
dc.title Advantages and challenges of microalgae as a source of oil for biodiesel en_ZA
dc.type Book en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-08-16T09:58:39Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Book en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.location Croatia en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Griffiths, M. J., Dicks, R. G., Richardson, C., & Harrison, S. T. L. (2011). <i>Advantages and challenges of microalgae as a source of oil for biodiesel</i>. Croatia: InTechOpen. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21278 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Griffiths, M J, R G Dicks, C Richardson, and S T L Harrison. <i>Advantages and challenges of microalgae as a source of oil for biodiesel</i>. Croatia: InTechOpen. 2011. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21278. en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Griffiths MJ, Dicks RG, Richardson C, Harrison STL. Advantages and challenges of microalgae as a source of oil for biodiesel. Croatia: InTechOpen; 2011.http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21278 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Book AU - Griffiths, M J AU - Dicks, R G AU - Richardson, C AU - Harrison, S T L AB - Microalgal oil is currently being considered as a promising alternative feedstock for biodiesel. The present demand for oil for biofuel production greatly exceeds the supply, hence alternative sources of biomass are required. Microalgae have several advantages over land-based crops in terms of oil production. Their simple unicellular structure and high photosynthetic efficiency allow for a potentially higher oil yield per area than that of the best oilseed crops. Algae can be grown on marginal land using brackish or salt water and hence do not compete for resources with conventional agriculture. They do not require herbicides or pesticides and their cultivation could be coupled with the uptake of CO2 from industrial waste streams, and the removal of excess nutrients from wastewater (Hodaifa et al., 2008; An et al., 2003). In addition to oil production, potentially valuable co-products such as pigments, antioxidants, nutraceuticals, fertilizer or feeds could be produced (Mata et al., 2010; Rodolfi et al., 2009). CY - Croatia DA - 2011 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town ED - Margarita Stoytcheva ED - Gisela Montero LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PP - Croatia PY - 2011 SM - 978-953-307-713-0 T1 - Advantages and challenges of microalgae as a source of oil for biodiesel TI - Advantages and challenges of microalgae as a source of oil for biodiesel UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21278 ER - en_ZA


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