Witzieshoek : women, cattle and rebellion

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Mager, Anne en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Beerstecher, Shan en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-11T09:50:02Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-11T09:50:02Z
dc.date.issued 1995 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Beerstecher, S. 1995. Witzieshoek : women, cattle and rebellion. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21177
dc.description Bibliography: pages 220-228. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This study focusses on the 1950 Witzieshoek rebellion from a gender perspective. It examines the context within which the rebellion occurred, spanning a period from 1930 to 1950 and looks at the impact of the rebellion on the state. The years leading up to the Witzieshoek rebellion were characterized by crisis as the government struggled to maintain authority over the African masses in general and African women in particular. Witzieshoek residents had to contend with growing deterioration of resources, migration and the implementation of a betterment programme. These had a differential impact on men and women in the reserve, leading to a loss of power in male authority structures and increasing autonomy for women. This fed into and moulded the development of a culture of resistance in the community which exploded in 1950 when the majority of the inhabitants revolted against the Native Affairs Department and the Trust. The Witzieshoek rebellion was a desperate bid to return to older and more familiar ways of organization which had been based on the productive and reproductive capacity of women. The men and women who rebelled were denouncing the organization of the community on Trust and Departmental terms. The response of the state to the rebellion was to appoint a Commission of Enquiry. The Commission, operating at a time when 'native' policy was being fiercely debated, was unable to offer the kind of solutions that Nationalist Party policy would eventually demand. Both the rebellion and the Commission of Enquiry failed to bring about any meaningful change to the conditions in Witzieshoek. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Historical Studies en_ZA
dc.title Witzieshoek : women, cattle and rebellion en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Historical Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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