Institutionalization as a contributing factor in antisocial behaviour : implications for statutory social work practice

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Isaacs, Gordon en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Clarke-Mcleod, Peter George en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-05T10:53:15Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-05T10:53:15Z
dc.date.issued 1987 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Clarke-Mcleod, P. 1987. Institutionalization as a contributing factor in antisocial behaviour : implications for statutory social work practice. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21148
dc.description Bibliography: pages 211-235. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This study looks at the role of statutory social work practice within the framework of current South African legislation. The implications of this legislation for persons exhibiting antisocial behaviour were examined in the light of institutional and community-based management options. An overview of the literature is presented in order to place the concepts of institutional care, community-based options and legal reform in perspective. These literature studies provided the framework for an exploratory survey of 70 purposely sampled statutory social work clients, with a view to re-examining institutionalization as a possible contributing factor in their antisocial behaviour. Using a structured interview schedule, the Researcher elicited information concerning the respondents' histories of institutionalization, their evaluations of its effects and other possible factors contributing to their antisocial behaviour. The outcome of the study confirmed the major research question, namely that institutionalization could be regarded as a contributing factor in antisocial behaviour. Conversely, the findings reflected major literature surveys which stated that institutionalization has an adaptive potential for certain client systems. Results flowing from both negative and positive factors are mediated by the characteristics of the institution; by those who are institutionalized, and by other factors which precede, coexist with or follow institutionalization. The study supports the preferential use of community-based alternatives in statutory social work as well as providing guidelines for institutional reform and future research. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Social Work en_ZA
dc.subject.other antisocial behaviour en_ZA
dc.title Institutionalization as a contributing factor in antisocial behaviour : implications for statutory social work practice en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Social Development en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSocSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Clarke-Mcleod, P. G. (1987). <i>Institutionalization as a contributing factor in antisocial behaviour : implications for statutory social work practice</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Social Development. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21148 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Clarke-Mcleod, Peter George. <i>"Institutionalization as a contributing factor in antisocial behaviour : implications for statutory social work practice."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Social Development, 1987. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21148 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Clarke-Mcleod PG. Institutionalization as a contributing factor in antisocial behaviour : implications for statutory social work practice. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Social Development, 1987 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21148 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Clarke-Mcleod, Peter George AB - This study looks at the role of statutory social work practice within the framework of current South African legislation. The implications of this legislation for persons exhibiting antisocial behaviour were examined in the light of institutional and community-based management options. An overview of the literature is presented in order to place the concepts of institutional care, community-based options and legal reform in perspective. These literature studies provided the framework for an exploratory survey of 70 purposely sampled statutory social work clients, with a view to re-examining institutionalization as a possible contributing factor in their antisocial behaviour. Using a structured interview schedule, the Researcher elicited information concerning the respondents' histories of institutionalization, their evaluations of its effects and other possible factors contributing to their antisocial behaviour. The outcome of the study confirmed the major research question, namely that institutionalization could be regarded as a contributing factor in antisocial behaviour. Conversely, the findings reflected major literature surveys which stated that institutionalization has an adaptive potential for certain client systems. Results flowing from both negative and positive factors are mediated by the characteristics of the institution; by those who are institutionalized, and by other factors which precede, coexist with or follow institutionalization. The study supports the preferential use of community-based alternatives in statutory social work as well as providing guidelines for institutional reform and future research. DA - 1987 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1987 T1 - Institutionalization as a contributing factor in antisocial behaviour : implications for statutory social work practice TI - Institutionalization as a contributing factor in antisocial behaviour : implications for statutory social work practice UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21148 ER - en_ZA


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