Selective inclusion of proteins into urinary calcium oxalate crystals: comparison between stone-prone and stone-free population groups

 

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dc.contributor.author Webber, D
dc.contributor.author Rodgers, A L
dc.contributor.author Sturrock, E D
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-05T10:32:12Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-05T10:32:12Z
dc.date.issued 2003
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2003.07.017
dc.identifier.citation Webber, D., Rodgers, A. L., & Sturrock, E. D. (2003). Selective inclusion of proteins into urinary calcium oxalate crystals: comparison between stone-prone and stone-free population groups. Journal of crystal growth, 259(1), 179-189. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 0022-0248 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21132
dc.description.abstract This study investigated whether incorporation of proteins into calcium oxalate urinary crystals is different in the black and white populations in South Africa and whether such differences could provide insight into the former group’s remarkably low stone incidence. CaOx monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) crystals were precipitated from each group’s urine after adjustment of the calcium concentrations to 0.5 and 12 mmol/l, respectively. Crystals were characterised by X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Intracrystalline proteins were analysed by SDS-PAGE and immunodetected for urinary prothrombin fragment 1 (UPTF1) and osteopontin. Crystals precipitated from the black and white groups’ control urines comprised mainly COM and COD, respectively. In both race groups UPTF1 was the major protein included in pure COM crystals while in pure COD it was osteopontin, but in the black group osteopontin was also included in COM. The black group’s urine crystals incorporated significantly more intracrystalline protein. Selective inclusion of UPTF1 and osteopontin may be due to the unique crystal structure of COM and COD and the proteins’ conformation at the different calcium concentrations at which these hydrates precipitate. The greater amount of intracrystalline inhibitory protein in the black group may be a factor in their low stone incidence. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Elsevier en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.source Journal of Crystal Growth en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00220248
dc.subject.other A1. Biocrystallization
dc.subject.other A1. Crystal morphology
dc.subject.other B1. Biological macromolecules
dc.subject.other B1. Proteins
dc.title Selective inclusion of proteins into urinary calcium oxalate crystals: comparison between stone-prone and stone-free population groups en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-08-02T13:45:27Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Webber, D., Rodgers, A. L., & Sturrock, E. D. (2003). Selective inclusion of proteins into urinary calcium oxalate crystals: comparison between stone-prone and stone-free population groups. <i>Journal of Crystal Growth</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21132 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Webber, D, A L Rodgers, and E D Sturrock "Selective inclusion of proteins into urinary calcium oxalate crystals: comparison between stone-prone and stone-free population groups." <i>Journal of Crystal Growth</i> (2003) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21132 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Webber D, Rodgers AL, Sturrock ED. Selective inclusion of proteins into urinary calcium oxalate crystals: comparison between stone-prone and stone-free population groups. Journal of Crystal Growth. 2003; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21132. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Webber, D AU - Rodgers, A L AU - Sturrock, E D AB - This study investigated whether incorporation of proteins into calcium oxalate urinary crystals is different in the black and white populations in South Africa and whether such differences could provide insight into the former group’s remarkably low stone incidence. CaOx monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) crystals were precipitated from each group’s urine after adjustment of the calcium concentrations to 0.5 and 12 mmol/l, respectively. Crystals were characterised by X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Intracrystalline proteins were analysed by SDS-PAGE and immunodetected for urinary prothrombin fragment 1 (UPTF1) and osteopontin. Crystals precipitated from the black and white groups’ control urines comprised mainly COM and COD, respectively. In both race groups UPTF1 was the major protein included in pure COM crystals while in pure COD it was osteopontin, but in the black group osteopontin was also included in COM. The black group’s urine crystals incorporated significantly more intracrystalline protein. Selective inclusion of UPTF1 and osteopontin may be due to the unique crystal structure of COM and COD and the proteins’ conformation at the different calcium concentrations at which these hydrates precipitate. The greater amount of intracrystalline inhibitory protein in the black group may be a factor in their low stone incidence. DA - 2003 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Journal of Crystal Growth LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2003 SM - 0022-0248 T1 - Selective inclusion of proteins into urinary calcium oxalate crystals: comparison between stone-prone and stone-free population groups TI - Selective inclusion of proteins into urinary calcium oxalate crystals: comparison between stone-prone and stone-free population groups UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21132 ER - en_ZA


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