Learning, cognition and ideology

 

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dc.contributor.author Ross, Don
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-27T11:10:27Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-27T11:10:27Z
dc.date.issued 2003
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sajpem.v22i2.31366
dc.identifier.citation Ross, D. (2003). Learning, cognition and ideology. South African Journal of Philosophy, 22(2), 139-156.
dc.identifier.issn 0258-0136,
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20879
dc.identifier.uri http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.4314/sajpem.v22i2.31366
dc.description.abstract Invited to give the 2000 Rick Turner Memorial Lecture, I pondered the following question: What explains the fact that the sincere thought of a brilliant and heroic person such as Turner can appear preposterous to me, if bad faith or scholarly ignorance on one side or the other are ruled out, as they should be in this case? I address this question by considering what ‘ideologies’ are from the perspective of cognitive learning theory. I describe the dynamics by which pressures for social coordination cause brains to implement alternative natural softwares for performing inferences in complex domains of association and inference. I conclude by noting that this need not imply normative relativism, since the relative justifications for conclusions produced by different softwares can still be debated. My aim is thus not to contest Turner’s ideology or political views, but to partially explain how learning produces differences that transcend factual disagreements and even ethical ones.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.source South African Journal of Philosophy
dc.source.uri http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rsph20#
dc.title Learning, cognition and ideology
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2015-12-22T13:37:03Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Commerce en_ZA
dc.publisher.department School of Economics en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Ross, D. (2003). Learning, cognition and ideology. <i>South African Journal of Philosophy</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20879 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Ross, Don "Learning, cognition and ideology." <i>South African Journal of Philosophy</i> (2003) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20879 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Ross D. Learning, cognition and ideology. South African Journal of Philosophy. 2003; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20879. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Ross, Don AB - Invited to give the 2000 Rick Turner Memorial Lecture, I pondered the following question: What explains the fact that the sincere thought of a brilliant and heroic person such as Turner can appear preposterous to me, if bad faith or scholarly ignorance on one side or the other are ruled out, as they should be in this case? I address this question by considering what ‘ideologies’ are from the perspective of cognitive learning theory. I describe the dynamics by which pressures for social coordination cause brains to implement alternative natural softwares for performing inferences in complex domains of association and inference. I conclude by noting that this need not imply normative relativism, since the relative justifications for conclusions produced by different softwares can still be debated. My aim is thus not to contest Turner’s ideology or political views, but to partially explain how learning produces differences that transcend factual disagreements and even ethical ones. DA - 2003 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - South African Journal of Philosophy LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2003 SM - 0258-0136, T1 - Learning, cognition and ideology TI - Learning, cognition and ideology UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20879 ER - en_ZA


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