Toward a greater understanding of the brain processes underlying handgrip and handgrip fatigue

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Rauch, Laurie en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Stein, Dan J en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Brooks, Samantha J en_ZA
dc.contributor.author King, Michael T C en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-27T10:12:28Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-27T10:12:28Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation King, M. 2016. Toward a greater understanding of the brain processes underlying handgrip and handgrip fatigue. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20832
dc.description.abstract Handgrip is a ubiquitous human movement that determines how we interact with our environment. It is involved in almost every aspect of daily life (e.g. opening a door, handling cutlery, using tools) and like all human movement, its application is limited by muscle fatigue. However, the supraspinal mechanisms of handgrip and handgrip fatigue are not fully understood despite the importance of this fundamental movement, numerous publications, and its presence as a longstanding research topic. This thesis investigates the brain mechanisms of handgrip and handgrip fatigue using fMRI. It begins with a review of the literature in Chapter one, which evaluates the theories and evidence for central control of handgrip and muscle fatigue as well as describing the rationale to perform the experiments in this thesis. The methodology and analyses are also reviewed to provide rationale for their use and to facilitate the interpretation of subsequent experimental results. In order to understand the supraspinal mechanisms of handgrip and handgrip fatigue it is logical to first understand the most fundamental grip type (power vs. precision) and pattern (static vs. dynamic) by which handgrip can be performed. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Exercise Scienc en_ZA
dc.title Toward a greater understanding of the brain processes underlying handgrip and handgrip fatigue en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department MRC/UCT RU for Exercise and Sport Medicine en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation King, M. T. C. (2016). <i>Toward a greater understanding of the brain processes underlying handgrip and handgrip fatigue</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,MRC/UCT RU for Exercise and Sport Medicine. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20832 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation King, Michael T C. <i>"Toward a greater understanding of the brain processes underlying handgrip and handgrip fatigue."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,MRC/UCT RU for Exercise and Sport Medicine, 2016. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20832 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation King MTC. Toward a greater understanding of the brain processes underlying handgrip and handgrip fatigue. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,MRC/UCT RU for Exercise and Sport Medicine, 2016 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20832 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - King, Michael T C AB - Handgrip is a ubiquitous human movement that determines how we interact with our environment. It is involved in almost every aspect of daily life (e.g. opening a door, handling cutlery, using tools) and like all human movement, its application is limited by muscle fatigue. However, the supraspinal mechanisms of handgrip and handgrip fatigue are not fully understood despite the importance of this fundamental movement, numerous publications, and its presence as a longstanding research topic. This thesis investigates the brain mechanisms of handgrip and handgrip fatigue using fMRI. It begins with a review of the literature in Chapter one, which evaluates the theories and evidence for central control of handgrip and muscle fatigue as well as describing the rationale to perform the experiments in this thesis. The methodology and analyses are also reviewed to provide rationale for their use and to facilitate the interpretation of subsequent experimental results. In order to understand the supraspinal mechanisms of handgrip and handgrip fatigue it is logical to first understand the most fundamental grip type (power vs. precision) and pattern (static vs. dynamic) by which handgrip can be performed. DA - 2016 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 T1 - Toward a greater understanding of the brain processes underlying handgrip and handgrip fatigue TI - Toward a greater understanding of the brain processes underlying handgrip and handgrip fatigue UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20832 ER - en_ZA


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