An experimental and theoretical study on the effect of strain rate on ductile damage

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Cloete, Trevor en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Govender, Reuben Ashley en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Weyer, Matthew en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-26T12:14:25Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-26T12:14:25Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Weyer, M. 2016. An experimental and theoretical study on the effect of strain rate on ductile damage. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20767
dc.description.abstract Simulation of fracture in ductile materials is a challenging problem, since it typically occurs at length scales that are orders of magnitude smaller than that of the structures in which the fracture is occurring and, hence, difficult to resolve . One approach is to avoid modelling the micro-mechanics of ductile fracture by describing the macroscopic effects of fracture using damage parameters. Damage in metals can be defined as a measure of discontinuous deformation of a body. Many numerical models include some measure of damage to predict when a material will fracture under certain conditions, however there is little consensus as to what measures and parameters will accurately predict the onset of fracture. Most notably, the effect of strain rate at the point of fracture is significant and must be taken into account. The literature indicates that in the quasistatic regime where inertial effects are negligible, an increase in strain rate increases the strain at fracture. However, the research conducted in this dissertation suggests the opposite is true. The aim of this research is to conduct further high strain rate ductile damage experiments so as to extend the available data set, and develop a pragmatic damage model to relate the plastic strain at fracture to material parameters such as triaxiality, lode angle and strain rate in a specimen, which is verified using experiments performed under various loading conditions and strain rates. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Blast phenomena en_ZA
dc.subject.other Mechanical Engineering en_ZA
dc.title An experimental and theoretical study on the effect of strain rate on ductile damage en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Blast Impact and Survivability Research Unit en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Weyer, M. (2016). <i>An experimental and theoretical study on the effect of strain rate on ductile damage</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Blast Impact and Survivability Research Unit. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20767 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Weyer, Matthew. <i>"An experimental and theoretical study on the effect of strain rate on ductile damage."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Blast Impact and Survivability Research Unit, 2016. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20767 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Weyer M. An experimental and theoretical study on the effect of strain rate on ductile damage. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Blast Impact and Survivability Research Unit, 2016 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20767 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Weyer, Matthew AB - Simulation of fracture in ductile materials is a challenging problem, since it typically occurs at length scales that are orders of magnitude smaller than that of the structures in which the fracture is occurring and, hence, difficult to resolve . One approach is to avoid modelling the micro-mechanics of ductile fracture by describing the macroscopic effects of fracture using damage parameters. Damage in metals can be defined as a measure of discontinuous deformation of a body. Many numerical models include some measure of damage to predict when a material will fracture under certain conditions, however there is little consensus as to what measures and parameters will accurately predict the onset of fracture. Most notably, the effect of strain rate at the point of fracture is significant and must be taken into account. The literature indicates that in the quasistatic regime where inertial effects are negligible, an increase in strain rate increases the strain at fracture. However, the research conducted in this dissertation suggests the opposite is true. The aim of this research is to conduct further high strain rate ductile damage experiments so as to extend the available data set, and develop a pragmatic damage model to relate the plastic strain at fracture to material parameters such as triaxiality, lode angle and strain rate in a specimen, which is verified using experiments performed under various loading conditions and strain rates. DA - 2016 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 T1 - An experimental and theoretical study on the effect of strain rate on ductile damage TI - An experimental and theoretical study on the effect of strain rate on ductile damage UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20767 ER - en_ZA


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