Perinatal mental health care in a rural African district, Uganda: a qualitative study of barriers, facilitators and needs

 

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dc.contributor.author Nakku, Juliet E M
dc.contributor.author Okello, Elialilia S
dc.contributor.author Kizza, Dorothy
dc.contributor.author Honikman, Simone
dc.contributor.author Ssebunnya, Joshua
dc.contributor.author Ndyanabangi, Sheila
dc.contributor.author Hanlon, Charlotte
dc.contributor.author Kigozi, Fred
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-26T07:16:57Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-26T07:16:57Z
dc.date.issued 2016-07-22
dc.identifier.citation Nakku, J. E., Okello, E. S., Kizza, D., Honikman, S., Ssebunnya, J., Ndyanabangi, S., ... & Kigozi, F. (2016). Perinatal mental health care in a rural African district, Uganda: a qualitative study of barriers, facilitators and needs. BMC Health Services Research, 16(1), 295. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1472-6963 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-016-1547-7
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20733
dc.description.abstract Background: Perinatal mental illness is a common and important public health problem, especially in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). This study aims to explore the barriers and facilitators, as well as perceptions about the feasibility and acceptability of plans to deliver perinatal mental health care in primary care settings in a low income, rural district in Uganda. Methods: Six focus group discussions comprising separate groups of pregnant and postpartum women and village health teams as well as eight key informant interviews were conducted in the local language using a topic guide. Transcribed data were translated into English, analyzed, and coded. Key themes were identified using a thematic analysis approach. Results: Participants perceived that there was an important unmet need for perinatal mental health care in the district. There was evidence of significant gaps in knowledge about mental health problems as well as negative attitudes amongst mothers and health care providers towards sufferers. Poverty and inability to afford transport to services, poor partner support and stigma were thought to add to the difficulties of perinatal women accessing care. There was an awareness of the need for interventions to respond to this neglected public health problem and a willingness of both community- and facility-based health care providers to provide care for mothers with mental health problems if equipped to do so by adequate training. Conclusion: This study highlights the acceptability and relevance of perinatal mental health care in a rural, lowincome country community. It also underscores some of the key barriers and potential facilitators to delivery of such care in primary care settings. The results of this study have implications for mental health service planning and development for perinatal populations in Uganda and will be useful in informing the development of integrated maternal mental health care in this rural district and in similar settings in other low and middle income countries. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher BioMed Central en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.source BMC Health Services Research en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/
dc.subject Maternal mental health
dc.subject Community mental health
dc.subject Primary health care
dc.subject Mental health services
dc.subject Postnatal depression
dc.subject Perinatal mental health
dc.title Perinatal mental health care in a rural African district, Uganda: a qualitative study of barriers, facilitators and needs en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-07-22T18:02:12Z
dc.language.rfc3066 en
dc.rights.holder The Author(s).
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health en_ZA
uct.type.filetype
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Nakku, J. E. M., Okello, E. S., Kizza, D., Honikman, S., Ssebunnya, J., Ndyanabangi, S., ... Kigozi, F. (2016). Perinatal mental health care in a rural African district, Uganda: a qualitative study of barriers, facilitators and needs. <i>BMC Health Services Research</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20733 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Nakku, Juliet E M, Elialilia S Okello, Dorothy Kizza, Simone Honikman, Joshua Ssebunnya, Sheila Ndyanabangi, Charlotte Hanlon, and Fred Kigozi "Perinatal mental health care in a rural African district, Uganda: a qualitative study of barriers, facilitators and needs." <i>BMC Health Services Research</i> (2016) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20733 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Nakku JEM, Okello ES, Kizza D, Honikman S, Ssebunnya J, Ndyanabangi S, et al. Perinatal mental health care in a rural African district, Uganda: a qualitative study of barriers, facilitators and needs. BMC Health Services Research. 2016; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20733. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Nakku, Juliet E M AU - Okello, Elialilia S AU - Kizza, Dorothy AU - Honikman, Simone AU - Ssebunnya, Joshua AU - Ndyanabangi, Sheila AU - Hanlon, Charlotte AU - Kigozi, Fred AB - Background: Perinatal mental illness is a common and important public health problem, especially in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). This study aims to explore the barriers and facilitators, as well as perceptions about the feasibility and acceptability of plans to deliver perinatal mental health care in primary care settings in a low income, rural district in Uganda. Methods: Six focus group discussions comprising separate groups of pregnant and postpartum women and village health teams as well as eight key informant interviews were conducted in the local language using a topic guide. Transcribed data were translated into English, analyzed, and coded. Key themes were identified using a thematic analysis approach. Results: Participants perceived that there was an important unmet need for perinatal mental health care in the district. There was evidence of significant gaps in knowledge about mental health problems as well as negative attitudes amongst mothers and health care providers towards sufferers. Poverty and inability to afford transport to services, poor partner support and stigma were thought to add to the difficulties of perinatal women accessing care. There was an awareness of the need for interventions to respond to this neglected public health problem and a willingness of both community- and facility-based health care providers to provide care for mothers with mental health problems if equipped to do so by adequate training. Conclusion: This study highlights the acceptability and relevance of perinatal mental health care in a rural, lowincome country community. It also underscores some of the key barriers and potential facilitators to delivery of such care in primary care settings. The results of this study have implications for mental health service planning and development for perinatal populations in Uganda and will be useful in informing the development of integrated maternal mental health care in this rural district and in similar settings in other low and middle income countries. DA - 2016-07-22 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/s12913-016-1547-7 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - BMC Health Services Research KW - Maternal mental health KW - Community mental health KW - Primary health care KW - Mental health services KW - Postnatal depression KW - Perinatal mental health LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 SM - 1472-6963 T1 - Perinatal mental health care in a rural African district, Uganda: a qualitative study of barriers, facilitators and needs TI - Perinatal mental health care in a rural African district, Uganda: a qualitative study of barriers, facilitators and needs UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20733 ER - en_ZA


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