Compounding in Namagowab and English: (exploring meaning creation in compounds)

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Bowerman, Sean Alan en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Caroline, Kloppert en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-25T11:27:40Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-25T11:27:40Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Caroline, K. 2016. Compounding in Namagowab and English: (exploring meaning creation in compounds). University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20685
dc.description.abstract This essay investigates compounding in Namagowab and English, which belong to two widely divergent groups of languages, the Khoesan and Indo-European, respectively. The first motive is to investigate how and why new words are created from existing ones. The reading and data interpretation seeks an understanding of word formation and an overview of semantic compositionality, structure and productivity, within the broad context of cognitive, lexicalist and distributed morphology paradigms. This coupled with history reading about the languages and its people, is used to speculate about why compounds feature in lexical creation. Compounding is prevalent in both languages and their distance in terms of phylogenetic relationships should allow limited generalizing about these processes of formation. Word lists taken from dictionaries in both languages were analyzed by entering the words in Excel spreadsheets so that various attributes of these words, such as word type, compound class (Noun, Verb, Preposition, Adjective and Adverb) and constituent class could be counted, and described with formulae, and compound and constituent meaning analyzed. The conclusion was that socio historical factors such as language contact, and aspects of cognition such as memory and transparency, account for compounding in a language in addition to typology. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Linguistics en_ZA
dc.title Compounding in Namagowab and English: (exploring meaning creation in compounds) en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Linguistics en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Caroline, K. (2016). <i>Compounding in Namagowab and English: (exploring meaning creation in compounds)</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Linguistics. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20685 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Caroline, Kloppert. <i>"Compounding in Namagowab and English: (exploring meaning creation in compounds)."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Linguistics, 2016. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20685 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Caroline K. Compounding in Namagowab and English: (exploring meaning creation in compounds). [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Linguistics, 2016 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20685 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Caroline, Kloppert AB - This essay investigates compounding in Namagowab and English, which belong to two widely divergent groups of languages, the Khoesan and Indo-European, respectively. The first motive is to investigate how and why new words are created from existing ones. The reading and data interpretation seeks an understanding of word formation and an overview of semantic compositionality, structure and productivity, within the broad context of cognitive, lexicalist and distributed morphology paradigms. This coupled with history reading about the languages and its people, is used to speculate about why compounds feature in lexical creation. Compounding is prevalent in both languages and their distance in terms of phylogenetic relationships should allow limited generalizing about these processes of formation. Word lists taken from dictionaries in both languages were analyzed by entering the words in Excel spreadsheets so that various attributes of these words, such as word type, compound class (Noun, Verb, Preposition, Adjective and Adverb) and constituent class could be counted, and described with formulae, and compound and constituent meaning analyzed. The conclusion was that socio historical factors such as language contact, and aspects of cognition such as memory and transparency, account for compounding in a language in addition to typology. DA - 2016 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 T1 - Compounding in Namagowab and English: (exploring meaning creation in compounds) TI - Compounding in Namagowab and English: (exploring meaning creation in compounds) UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20685 ER - en_ZA


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