Longitudinal colonisation by Streptococcus pneumoniae and nasopharyngeal microbial interactions in health and disease: a South African birth cohort study

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Mulder, Nicola en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Kaba, Mamadou en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Dube, Felix Sizwe en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-25T07:12:35Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-25T07:12:35Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Dube, F. 2016. Longitudinal colonisation by Streptococcus pneumoniae and nasopharyngeal microbial interactions in health and disease: a South African birth cohort study. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20649
dc.description.abstract Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is the most common cause of childhood pneumonia. Nasopharyngeal (NP) colonization by the pneumococcus is a necessary first step in the pathogenesis of pneumonia and yet the dynamic nature of pneumococcal colonization remains incompletely understood. In children, asymptomatic colonization of the nasopharynx by the pneumococcus is common and also serves as a reservoir for person-to-person transmission. We aimed to investigate in detail, the dynamics of pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage over the first year of life, in a cohort of South African children, particularly after implementation of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13). The study will further elucidate the interaction of S. pneumoniae with other respiratory pathogens and how such interactions may contribute development of severe disease. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Medical Microbiology en_ZA
dc.title Longitudinal colonisation by Streptococcus pneumoniae and nasopharyngeal microbial interactions in health and disease: a South African birth cohort study en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Medical Biochemistry en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Dube, F. S. (2016). <i>Longitudinal colonisation by Streptococcus pneumoniae and nasopharyngeal microbial interactions in health and disease: a South African birth cohort study</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Medical Biochemistry. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20649 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Dube, Felix Sizwe. <i>"Longitudinal colonisation by Streptococcus pneumoniae and nasopharyngeal microbial interactions in health and disease: a South African birth cohort study."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Medical Biochemistry, 2016. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20649 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Dube FS. Longitudinal colonisation by Streptococcus pneumoniae and nasopharyngeal microbial interactions in health and disease: a South African birth cohort study. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Division of Medical Biochemistry, 2016 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20649 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Dube, Felix Sizwe AB - Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is the most common cause of childhood pneumonia. Nasopharyngeal (NP) colonization by the pneumococcus is a necessary first step in the pathogenesis of pneumonia and yet the dynamic nature of pneumococcal colonization remains incompletely understood. In children, asymptomatic colonization of the nasopharynx by the pneumococcus is common and also serves as a reservoir for person-to-person transmission. We aimed to investigate in detail, the dynamics of pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage over the first year of life, in a cohort of South African children, particularly after implementation of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13). The study will further elucidate the interaction of S. pneumoniae with other respiratory pathogens and how such interactions may contribute development of severe disease. DA - 2016 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 T1 - Longitudinal colonisation by Streptococcus pneumoniae and nasopharyngeal microbial interactions in health and disease: a South African birth cohort study TI - Longitudinal colonisation by Streptococcus pneumoniae and nasopharyngeal microbial interactions in health and disease: a South African birth cohort study UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20649 ER - en_ZA


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