'No-touch' breast-implant insertion device

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Vicatos, George en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Ameen, Shaa'ista en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-20T06:58:24Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-20T06:58:24Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Ameen, S. 2016. 'No-touch' breast-implant insertion device. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20491
dc.description.abstract Capsular Contracture (CC) has been identified as the major cause of breast-implant failures and subsequent discomfort, pain and shape deformation following cosmetic breast implantation procedures. It has been documented that CC is primarily due to bacteria which are transmitted in the breast-cavity through conventional implantation. A 'no-touch' implant insertion technique has therefore been identified as the optimal method in potentially reducing CC rates. This describes an implant delivery without the implant ever touching: gloves (even during post-insertion implant orientation assessments), retractors or the patient's skin and breast-tissue; which is inherently unachievable with the traditional finger-manipulation method. To date, the most significant improvement in the insertion process has been a 'minimal-touch' technique, i.e. with the Keller-Funnel. This study was therefore in the design and development of a safe 'no-touch' insertion device for the delivery of silicone breast-implants. Parameters included a horizontal 45 mm incision, which can stretch up to a maximum vertical central distance of 35 mm. The proposed design featured a positive-displacement method with: (a) pressurized air as the insertion 'force', (b) an inverting-bag (partially inserted with the implant) to eliminate direct glove/implant contact, and (c) a built-in retractor with a breast-cavity air-removal path to reduce implant insertion resistance due to trapped air. The implant, in the device, remains closed to the environment and separated from the wound margin thus, eliminating skin/implant contact and further providing wound protection. Finally, the design employed an eccentric funnel shape for device use at the inframammary incision site with a suggested subpectoral or submuscular pocket placement, i.e. to eliminate breast-tissue/implant contact. Through experimentation with various implant sizes, device dimensions were suitable for implant-volumes up to 428.57 cm3. A 1 bar air supply was used to test the prototype and prove the concept on a silicone cast breast-model. Leverage of the built-in retractor efficiently opened the incision for device placement multiple times and, the successful insertions of the implants and inverting-bag into the breast-model indicated that a 'no-touch' technique was achievable. This was at a maximum insertion time of 4.2 seconds, amongst eight implants ranging from 242 to 428.57 cm3. However, the continued post-insertion air supply resulted in inflation of the inverted bag in the breast. This is at a high risk of developing a thoracic wall deformity and/or embolism. Suggestions were made to improve the design and eliminate this fault. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Biomedical Engineering en_ZA
dc.title 'No-touch' breast-implant insertion device en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Biomedical Engineering en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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