Preconception maternal exposure to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis transfers protection against Nb to her offspring

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Horsnell, William en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Brombacher, Frank en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Darby, Matthew G en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-18T12:44:42Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-18T12:44:42Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Darby, M. 2016. Preconception maternal exposure to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis transfers protection against Nb to her offspring. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20410
dc.description.abstract In early life the immature immune system has a reduced ability to control infection. This susceptibility is offset by transfer of protective immune components from the mother. Helminth infections are widespread and can have a long lasting influence on host immunity. Children of mothers exposed to helminth infections may display T cell sensitization to endemic helminth infections and associations have been made between maternal helminth infection and altered immune responses to childhood diseases and vaccinations. This shows that helminth-modified maternal immunity may imprint on early offspring immune development in-utero or through breast milk in the form of transfer of, for example, antibodies, cytokines and lymphocytes. Our study shows that, in mice, maternal infection with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis is not only associated with a passive transfer of antigen specific antibody(IgG1) but also inherently alters offspring immunity, increasing offspring cytokine production, alveolar macrophages, lung neutrophils and B cell population development and proliferation. Pups born to N. brasiliensis exposed mothers also had increased populations of lung and spleen CD4+ cells and higher subpopulations of central memory and effector CD4+ cells compared to pups born to naive mothers. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine en_ZA
dc.title Preconception maternal exposure to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis transfers protection against Nb to her offspring en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Darby, M. G. (2016). <i>Preconception maternal exposure to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis transfers protection against Nb to her offspring</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20410 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Darby, Matthew G. <i>"Preconception maternal exposure to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis transfers protection against Nb to her offspring."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, 2016. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20410 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Darby MG. Preconception maternal exposure to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis transfers protection against Nb to her offspring. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, 2016 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20410 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Darby, Matthew G AB - In early life the immature immune system has a reduced ability to control infection. This susceptibility is offset by transfer of protective immune components from the mother. Helminth infections are widespread and can have a long lasting influence on host immunity. Children of mothers exposed to helminth infections may display T cell sensitization to endemic helminth infections and associations have been made between maternal helminth infection and altered immune responses to childhood diseases and vaccinations. This shows that helminth-modified maternal immunity may imprint on early offspring immune development in-utero or through breast milk in the form of transfer of, for example, antibodies, cytokines and lymphocytes. Our study shows that, in mice, maternal infection with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis is not only associated with a passive transfer of antigen specific antibody(IgG1) but also inherently alters offspring immunity, increasing offspring cytokine production, alveolar macrophages, lung neutrophils and B cell population development and proliferation. Pups born to N. brasiliensis exposed mothers also had increased populations of lung and spleen CD4+ cells and higher subpopulations of central memory and effector CD4+ cells compared to pups born to naive mothers. DA - 2016 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 T1 - Preconception maternal exposure to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis transfers protection against Nb to her offspring TI - Preconception maternal exposure to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis transfers protection against Nb to her offspring UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20410 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record