A multi-scale study on the movement ecology of Afrotropical waterbirds

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Cumming, Graeme S en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Henry, Dominic A W en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-15T11:18:16Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-15T11:18:16Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Henry, D. 2016. A multi-scale study on the movement ecology of Afrotropical waterbirds. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20365
dc.description.abstract Understanding the processes and mechanisms governing animal movement is a fundamental goal in ecology. Processes driving movement can occur across multiple spatiotemporal scales and have important consequences for the structure and dynamics of populations, communities and ecosystems. The study of movement provides insights into the ecological resources and habitats necessary for persistence of species and communities. It also provides a theoretical and applied basis from which to formulate informed conservation plans. Waterbirds in semiarid southern Africa are an ideal study group for understanding interactions between movement and environmental factors because they exhibit a wide range of movement strategies and are located within a landscape in which resources are characterised by high levels of spatiotemporal variability. Emphasis has been placed on understanding movement phenomena from individually-tracked animals, but cases which consider this approach in conjunction with traditional community ecology perspectives are rare. In this thesis I explored questions of movement in both individuals and communities, and argue that an integrated multi-scale approach is necessary to advance our broader understanding of movement in waterbirds. In the first part of the study I addressed an individual-level movement perspective. I used fine-scale telemetry data from 35 individually tracked Egyptian Geese Alopochenaegyptiaca and Red-billed Teal Anas erythrorhyncha with novel analytical techniques to explore questions of trade-offs in habitat selection, functional responses and whether movement responses to landscape resources are reactive or prescient. My findings suggested that, at the home-range scale, both forage optimisation and predation risk were limiting factors of movement and habitat selection of Egyptian Geese. I also showed for the first time that waterbirds exhibit functional responses in relation to changes in the availability of habitat types. I subsequently showed that the proximate drivers of waterfowl movement are the dynamics of rainfall and primary productivity. Egyptian Geese and Red-billed Teal were able to perceive and respond to temporal shifts in resource conditions prior to habitat patch occupation. This in turn suggested that their movements in semi-arid landscapes are underpinned by an intimate knowledge of the local environment and that waterfowl exhibit a complex behavioural movement strategy. In the second part of the study I used waterbird count data collected from wetlands in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, to address the community-level movement perspective. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Biological Conservation en_ZA
dc.subject.other Ornithology en_ZA
dc.subject.other Ecology and Conservation en_ZA
dc.title A multi-scale study on the movement ecology of Afrotropical waterbirds en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Henry, D. A. W. (2016). <i>A multi-scale study on the movement ecology of Afrotropical waterbirds</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20365 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Henry, Dominic A W. <i>"A multi-scale study on the movement ecology of Afrotropical waterbirds."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology, 2016. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20365 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Henry DAW. A multi-scale study on the movement ecology of Afrotropical waterbirds. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology, 2016 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20365 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Henry, Dominic A W AB - Understanding the processes and mechanisms governing animal movement is a fundamental goal in ecology. Processes driving movement can occur across multiple spatiotemporal scales and have important consequences for the structure and dynamics of populations, communities and ecosystems. The study of movement provides insights into the ecological resources and habitats necessary for persistence of species and communities. It also provides a theoretical and applied basis from which to formulate informed conservation plans. Waterbirds in semiarid southern Africa are an ideal study group for understanding interactions between movement and environmental factors because they exhibit a wide range of movement strategies and are located within a landscape in which resources are characterised by high levels of spatiotemporal variability. Emphasis has been placed on understanding movement phenomena from individually-tracked animals, but cases which consider this approach in conjunction with traditional community ecology perspectives are rare. In this thesis I explored questions of movement in both individuals and communities, and argue that an integrated multi-scale approach is necessary to advance our broader understanding of movement in waterbirds. In the first part of the study I addressed an individual-level movement perspective. I used fine-scale telemetry data from 35 individually tracked Egyptian Geese Alopochenaegyptiaca and Red-billed Teal Anas erythrorhyncha with novel analytical techniques to explore questions of trade-offs in habitat selection, functional responses and whether movement responses to landscape resources are reactive or prescient. My findings suggested that, at the home-range scale, both forage optimisation and predation risk were limiting factors of movement and habitat selection of Egyptian Geese. I also showed for the first time that waterbirds exhibit functional responses in relation to changes in the availability of habitat types. I subsequently showed that the proximate drivers of waterfowl movement are the dynamics of rainfall and primary productivity. Egyptian Geese and Red-billed Teal were able to perceive and respond to temporal shifts in resource conditions prior to habitat patch occupation. This in turn suggested that their movements in semi-arid landscapes are underpinned by an intimate knowledge of the local environment and that waterfowl exhibit a complex behavioural movement strategy. In the second part of the study I used waterbird count data collected from wetlands in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, to address the community-level movement perspective. DA - 2016 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 T1 - A multi-scale study on the movement ecology of Afrotropical waterbirds TI - A multi-scale study on the movement ecology of Afrotropical waterbirds UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20365 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record