Development, implementation and impact of Phlebotomy training on blood sample rejection and Phlebotomy knowledge of primary health care workers at selected primary health care facilities in Cape Town: a quasi-experimental study design

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Namane, Mosedi en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Mukinda, Fidele Kanyimbu en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Abbas, Mumtaz en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-13T07:47:44Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-13T07:47:44Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Abbas, M. 2016. Development, implementation and impact of Phlebotomy training on blood sample rejection and Phlebotomy knowledge of primary health care workers at selected primary health care facilities in Cape Town: a quasi-experimental study design. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20331
dc.description.abstract Background: There is an increasing amount of blood sample rejection at primary health care facilities (PHCFs) impacting negatively on the staff, facility, patient and laboratory costs. Aim: The primary objective was to determine the rejection rate and reasons for blood sample rejection at four PHCFs pre and post phlebotomy training. The secondary objective was to determine whether phlebotomy training improved knowledge amongst primary health care providers (HCPs) and to develop a tool for blood sample acceptability. Study Setting: Two Community Health Centres (CHCs) and two Community Day Centres (CDCs) in Cape Town. Methods: A quasi-experimental study design. Results: The sample rejection rate was 0.79% (n= 60) at CHC A, 1.13% (n= 45) at CHC B, 1.64% (n= 38) at CDC C and 1.36% (n= 8) at CDC D pre training. The rejection rates remained approximately the same post training (p>0.05). The same phlebotomy questionnaire was administered pre and post training to HCPs. The average score increased from 6 3% (95% CI 6.97 - 17.03) to 96% (95% CI 16.91 - 20.09) at CHC A (p 0.039), 58% (95% CI 9.09 – 14.91) to 93% (95% CI 17.64 – 18.76) at CHC B (p 0.006), 60% (95% CI 8.84 – 13.13) to 97% (95% CI 16.14 – 19.29) at CDC C (p 0.001) and 63% (95% CI 9.81 – 13.33) to 97% (95% CI 18.08 – 19.07) at CDC D (p 0.001). Conclusion: There is no statistically significant improvement in the rejection rate of blood samples (p>0.05) post training despite knowledge improving in all HCPs (p <0.05). en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Family Medicine en_ZA
dc.title Development, implementation and impact of Phlebotomy training on blood sample rejection and Phlebotomy knowledge of primary health care workers at selected primary health care facilities in Cape Town: a quasi-experimental study design en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Public Health and Family Medicine en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MMed en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Abbas, M. (2016). <i>Development, implementation and impact of Phlebotomy training on blood sample rejection and Phlebotomy knowledge of primary health care workers at selected primary health care facilities in Cape Town: a quasi-experimental study design</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Public Health and Family Medicine. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20331 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Abbas, Mumtaz. <i>"Development, implementation and impact of Phlebotomy training on blood sample rejection and Phlebotomy knowledge of primary health care workers at selected primary health care facilities in Cape Town: a quasi-experimental study design."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Public Health and Family Medicine, 2016. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20331 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Abbas M. Development, implementation and impact of Phlebotomy training on blood sample rejection and Phlebotomy knowledge of primary health care workers at selected primary health care facilities in Cape Town: a quasi-experimental study design. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Public Health and Family Medicine, 2016 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20331 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Abbas, Mumtaz AB - Background: There is an increasing amount of blood sample rejection at primary health care facilities (PHCFs) impacting negatively on the staff, facility, patient and laboratory costs. Aim: The primary objective was to determine the rejection rate and reasons for blood sample rejection at four PHCFs pre and post phlebotomy training. The secondary objective was to determine whether phlebotomy training improved knowledge amongst primary health care providers (HCPs) and to develop a tool for blood sample acceptability. Study Setting: Two Community Health Centres (CHCs) and two Community Day Centres (CDCs) in Cape Town. Methods: A quasi-experimental study design. Results: The sample rejection rate was 0.79% (n= 60) at CHC A, 1.13% (n= 45) at CHC B, 1.64% (n= 38) at CDC C and 1.36% (n= 8) at CDC D pre training. The rejection rates remained approximately the same post training (p>0.05). The same phlebotomy questionnaire was administered pre and post training to HCPs. The average score increased from 6 3% (95% CI 6.97 - 17.03) to 96% (95% CI 16.91 - 20.09) at CHC A (p 0.039), 58% (95% CI 9.09 – 14.91) to 93% (95% CI 17.64 – 18.76) at CHC B (p 0.006), 60% (95% CI 8.84 – 13.13) to 97% (95% CI 16.14 – 19.29) at CDC C (p 0.001) and 63% (95% CI 9.81 – 13.33) to 97% (95% CI 18.08 – 19.07) at CDC D (p 0.001). Conclusion: There is no statistically significant improvement in the rejection rate of blood samples (p>0.05) post training despite knowledge improving in all HCPs (p <0.05). DA - 2016 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 T1 - Development, implementation and impact of Phlebotomy training on blood sample rejection and Phlebotomy knowledge of primary health care workers at selected primary health care facilities in Cape Town: a quasi-experimental study design TI - Development, implementation and impact of Phlebotomy training on blood sample rejection and Phlebotomy knowledge of primary health care workers at selected primary health care facilities in Cape Town: a quasi-experimental study design UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20331 ER - en_ZA


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