Absences, exclusivities and utopias: Afrikaans film as a cinema of political impotence, 1994 - 2014

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Botha, Martin P en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Broodryk, Chris Willem en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-11T13:51:44Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-11T13:51:44Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Broodryk, C. 2016. Absences, exclusivities and utopias: Afrikaans film as a cinema of political impotence, 1994 - 2014. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20299
dc.description.abstract This thesis develops a conceptual and theoretical framework within which to position contemporary Afrikaans cinema as a cinema of political impotence. Afrikaans cinema is first located within the tensions of democratic post-transitional South African society and linked to the identity politics of being identified as 'Afrikaner' or 'Afrikaans speaking'. The thesis provides a critical overview of film scholar Thomas Elsaesser's studies of (New) German Cinema and Hollywood, identifying key notions such as double occupancy to inform the study's vocabulary, and discussing how certain cultures have responded to traumatic events in which they were complicit. The thesis then links Elsaesser's studies to Fredric Jameson's views on political cinema and the political failures of postmodernism. This conceptual and theoretical framework identifies and problematises the neoliberal structures that guide much of Afrikaans filmmaking, and offers a historical overview of key moments and figures in South African (primarily Afrikaans) filmmaking in order to demonstrate that there Afrikaans cinema. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Film Studies en_ZA
dc.title Absences, exclusivities and utopias: Afrikaans film as a cinema of political impotence, 1994 - 2014 en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Film and Media Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Broodryk, C. W. (2016). <i>Absences, exclusivities and utopias: Afrikaans film as a cinema of political impotence, 1994 - 2014</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Film and Media Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20299 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Broodryk, Chris Willem. <i>"Absences, exclusivities and utopias: Afrikaans film as a cinema of political impotence, 1994 - 2014."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Film and Media Studies, 2016. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20299 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Broodryk CW. Absences, exclusivities and utopias: Afrikaans film as a cinema of political impotence, 1994 - 2014. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Film and Media Studies, 2016 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20299 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Broodryk, Chris Willem AB - This thesis develops a conceptual and theoretical framework within which to position contemporary Afrikaans cinema as a cinema of political impotence. Afrikaans cinema is first located within the tensions of democratic post-transitional South African society and linked to the identity politics of being identified as 'Afrikaner' or 'Afrikaans speaking'. The thesis provides a critical overview of film scholar Thomas Elsaesser's studies of (New) German Cinema and Hollywood, identifying key notions such as double occupancy to inform the study's vocabulary, and discussing how certain cultures have responded to traumatic events in which they were complicit. The thesis then links Elsaesser's studies to Fredric Jameson's views on political cinema and the political failures of postmodernism. This conceptual and theoretical framework identifies and problematises the neoliberal structures that guide much of Afrikaans filmmaking, and offers a historical overview of key moments and figures in South African (primarily Afrikaans) filmmaking in order to demonstrate that there Afrikaans cinema. DA - 2016 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 T1 - Absences, exclusivities and utopias: Afrikaans film as a cinema of political impotence, 1994 - 2014 TI - Absences, exclusivities and utopias: Afrikaans film as a cinema of political impotence, 1994 - 2014 UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20299 ER - en_ZA


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