Race, inequality and urbanisation in the Johannesburg Region, 1946-1996

 

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dc.contributor.author Crankshaw, Owen
dc.contributor.author Parnell, Susan
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-06T12:55:36Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-06T12:55:36Z
dc.date.issued 2002
dc.identifier.citation Crankshaw, O., & Parnell, S. (2002). Race, inequality and urbanisation in the Johannesburg region, 1946-1996. Centre for Social Science Research, University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20226
dc.description.abstract The city of Johannesburg lies at the heart of a sprawling metropolis. This metropolis, which we shall call the Johannesburg region, roughly corresponds with the boundaries of Gauteng Province.1 It stretches from Soshanguve in the north to Vanderbijlpark in the south and from Carletonville in the west to Springs in the east (Fig.1). While Johannesburg is an obvious example of a large city in a poor country that is riddled by social and economic inequality, there is a certain irony in its portrayal as a world city. After all, only five years ago, Johannesburg was the hub of a pariah nation that was the object of one of the most successful international sanctions campaigns. Notwithstanding the impact of the boycott against apartheid, Johannesburg has long served as the major urban centre of southern Africa. It is an unusually cosmopolitan city, with extensive demographic, political, and economic connections with Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America, that date back to colonial times (Parnell and Pirie, 1991). Increasingly strong links are now also being forged with Australasia through immigration and sport. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.title Race, inequality and urbanisation in the Johannesburg Region, 1946-1996 en_ZA
dc.type Working Paper en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-04-22T10:28:16Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Research paper en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Social Science Research(CSSR) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Crankshaw, O., & Parnell, S. (2002). <i>Race, inequality and urbanisation in the Johannesburg Region, 1946-1996</i> University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Social Science Research(CSSR). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20226 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Crankshaw, Owen, and Susan Parnell <i>Race, inequality and urbanisation in the Johannesburg Region, 1946-1996.</i> University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Social Science Research(CSSR), 2002. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20226 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Crankshaw O, Parnell S. Race, inequality and urbanisation in the Johannesburg Region, 1946-1996. 2002 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20226 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Working Paper AU - Crankshaw, Owen AU - Parnell, Susan AB - The city of Johannesburg lies at the heart of a sprawling metropolis. This metropolis, which we shall call the Johannesburg region, roughly corresponds with the boundaries of Gauteng Province.1 It stretches from Soshanguve in the north to Vanderbijlpark in the south and from Carletonville in the west to Springs in the east (Fig.1). While Johannesburg is an obvious example of a large city in a poor country that is riddled by social and economic inequality, there is a certain irony in its portrayal as a world city. After all, only five years ago, Johannesburg was the hub of a pariah nation that was the object of one of the most successful international sanctions campaigns. Notwithstanding the impact of the boycott against apartheid, Johannesburg has long served as the major urban centre of southern Africa. It is an unusually cosmopolitan city, with extensive demographic, political, and economic connections with Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America, that date back to colonial times (Parnell and Pirie, 1991). Increasingly strong links are now also being forged with Australasia through immigration and sport. DA - 2002 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2002 T1 - Race, inequality and urbanisation in the Johannesburg Region, 1946-1996 TI - Race, inequality and urbanisation in the Johannesburg Region, 1946-1996 UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20226 ER - en_ZA


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