Africans' surprising universalism

 

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dc.contributor.author Bratton, Michael
dc.contributor.author Mattes, Robert
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-05T13:52:58Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-05T13:52:58Z
dc.date.issued 2001
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1353/jod.2001.0002
dc.identifier.citation Bratton, M., & Mattes, R. B. (2001). Africans' surprising universalism. Journal of democracy, 12(1), 107-121. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1045-5736 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20212
dc.description.abstract Africa is a latecomer to democratization. In terms of timing, Africa has followed rather than led other continents in giving birth to the reform movements that have installed elected governments, multiparty systems, and more open societies around the world. Since many African countries are dependent on foreign aid, they have also experienced weighty external pressures to liberalize. One should not automatically conclude, however, that the impetus for reform comes from outside the continent rather than from within. If political liberalization were a Northern idea being foisted on an unwilling South, then certain empirical facts should follow. One would expect Africans to 1) be unaware of the concept of democracy; 2) have distinct cultural understandings of its content; 3) be unsupportive of regimes based on competitive principles; 4) prefer alternative political regimes; and 5) be unsatisfied with the performance of democratic regimes in practice. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Johns Hopkins University Press en_ZA
dc.source Journal of Democracy en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_democracy/
dc.title Africans' surprising universalism en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-05-18T10:29:08Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Social Science Research(CSSR) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Bratton, M., & Mattes, R. (2001). Africans' surprising universalism. <i>Journal of Democracy</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20212 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Bratton, Michael, and Robert Mattes "Africans' surprising universalism." <i>Journal of Democracy</i> (2001) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20212 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Bratton M, Mattes R. Africans' surprising universalism. Journal of Democracy. 2001; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20212. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Bratton, Michael AU - Mattes, Robert AB - Africa is a latecomer to democratization. In terms of timing, Africa has followed rather than led other continents in giving birth to the reform movements that have installed elected governments, multiparty systems, and more open societies around the world. Since many African countries are dependent on foreign aid, they have also experienced weighty external pressures to liberalize. One should not automatically conclude, however, that the impetus for reform comes from outside the continent rather than from within. If political liberalization were a Northern idea being foisted on an unwilling South, then certain empirical facts should follow. One would expect Africans to 1) be unaware of the concept of democracy; 2) have distinct cultural understandings of its content; 3) be unsupportive of regimes based on competitive principles; 4) prefer alternative political regimes; and 5) be unsatisfied with the performance of democratic regimes in practice. DA - 2001 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Journal of Democracy LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2001 SM - 1045-5736 T1 - Africans' surprising universalism TI - Africans' surprising universalism UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20212 ER - en_ZA


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