AIDS growth and distribution in South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.author Nattrass, Nicoli
dc.date.accessioned 2016-06-28T17:53:17Z
dc.date.available 2016-06-28T17:53:17Z
dc.date.issued 2002
dc.identifier.citation Nattrass, N. (2002). AIDS, growth and distribution in South Africa. Centre for Social Science Research, University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20159
dc.description.abstract This paper discusses recent research into the economic impact of AIDS in South Africa. It focuses on demographic and macroeconomic modelling and on firm-level impact studies. While the overall picture is murky, certain trends and findings are indicative of a likely increase in inequality. Relatively skilled workers could benefit from greater employment, higher wages, a larger supply of products produced for their niche markets, and may also live longer as it becomes economically viable for firms to provide anti-retroviral medication. The relatively unskilled and unemployed will probably experience declining income, falling consumer welfare, and suffer greater morbidity and mortality from AIDS. The size of the pie may shrink as a result of AIDS, but employed people - and especially the skilled amongst them - will enjoy a growing share. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.title AIDS growth and distribution in South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Working Paper en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-06-27T12:26:05Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Research paper en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Social Science Research(CSSR) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)