Simulacra : constructing narrative in the studio tableau

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Inggs, Stephen en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Riley, Eustacia en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-06-27T07:46:04Z
dc.date.available 2016-06-27T07:46:04Z
dc.date.issued 2002 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Riley, E. 2002. Simulacra : constructing narrative in the studio tableau. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20145
dc.description Bibliography: pages 61-63. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The content and form of the work completed for this degree is intended as a narrative. This narrative is constructed to tell stories of my family, and of myself, in a way that openly stresses the playful, mythical, and fictional nature of such narratives in the family and in history. These narratives are not always easily recognisable, believable, or unified, and are read through an arrangement of details. Initially, I intended my tableaux to function as 'emblematic' portraits. In other words, I intended to describe the members of my family by distilling their essential characteristics into a descriptive arrangement of symbolic objects. Although I became aware of the limitations of symbolism, and became more interested in narrative and display, the content of my work has remained personal and descriptive, even though I have emphasised the fictional over the elegiac. My family is not really one of collectors - my grandmother tore up and burnt many of our family photographs when my grandfather died, before she went into an old-age home. She wanted to 'travel light'. What we have left are the stories, the anecdotes and the proverbs: an oral history, or a ·postmemory'. These inherited tales are told through the snapshots that did survive, as they are in all families who take pictures. I have retold and reconstructed my own narratives, because this is the nature of the family romance for everyone - it resides in a world of images, incidental details, and surfaces. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Fine Art en_ZA
dc.title Simulacra : constructing narrative in the studio tableau en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Michaelis School of Fine Art en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Riley, E. (2002). <i>Simulacra : constructing narrative in the studio tableau</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Michaelis School of Fine Art. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20145 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Riley, Eustacia. <i>"Simulacra : constructing narrative in the studio tableau."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Michaelis School of Fine Art, 2002. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20145 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Riley E. Simulacra : constructing narrative in the studio tableau. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Michaelis School of Fine Art, 2002 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20145 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Riley, Eustacia AB - The content and form of the work completed for this degree is intended as a narrative. This narrative is constructed to tell stories of my family, and of myself, in a way that openly stresses the playful, mythical, and fictional nature of such narratives in the family and in history. These narratives are not always easily recognisable, believable, or unified, and are read through an arrangement of details. Initially, I intended my tableaux to function as 'emblematic' portraits. In other words, I intended to describe the members of my family by distilling their essential characteristics into a descriptive arrangement of symbolic objects. Although I became aware of the limitations of symbolism, and became more interested in narrative and display, the content of my work has remained personal and descriptive, even though I have emphasised the fictional over the elegiac. My family is not really one of collectors - my grandmother tore up and burnt many of our family photographs when my grandfather died, before she went into an old-age home. She wanted to 'travel light'. What we have left are the stories, the anecdotes and the proverbs: an oral history, or a ·postmemory'. These inherited tales are told through the snapshots that did survive, as they are in all families who take pictures. I have retold and reconstructed my own narratives, because this is the nature of the family romance for everyone - it resides in a world of images, incidental details, and surfaces. DA - 2002 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2002 T1 - Simulacra : constructing narrative in the studio tableau TI - Simulacra : constructing narrative in the studio tableau UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20145 ER - en_ZA


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