Setting targets for human resources for eye health in sub-Saharan Africa: what evidence should be used?

 

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dc.contributor.author Courtright, Paul
dc.contributor.author Mathenge, Wanjiku
dc.contributor.author Kello, Amir B
dc.contributor.author Cook, Colin
dc.contributor.author Kalua, Khumbo
dc.contributor.author Lewallen, Susan
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-23T14:00:14Z
dc.date.available 2016-05-23T14:00:14Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Courtright, P., Mathenge, W., Kello, A. B., Cook, C., Kalua, K., & Lewallen, S. (2016). Setting targets for human resources for eye health in sub-Saharan Africa: what evidence should be used?. Human Resources for Health, 14(1), 1. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1478-4491 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-016-0107-x
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19797
dc.description.abstract With a global target set at reducing vision loss by 25% by the year 2019, sub-Saharan Africa with an estimated 4.8 million blind persons will require human resources for eye health (HReH) that need to be available, appropriately skilled, supported, and productive. Targets for HReH are useful for planning, monitoring, and resource mobilization, but they need to be updated and informed by evidence of effectiveness and efficiency. Supporting evidence should take into consideration (1) ever-changing disease-specific issues including the epidemiology, the complexity of diagnosis and treatment, and the technology needed for diagnosis and treatment of each condition; (2) the changing demands for vision-related services of an increasingly urbanized population; and (3) interconnected health system issues that affect productivity and quality. The existing targets for HReH and some of the existing strategies such as task shifting of cataract surgery and trichiasis surgery, as well as the scope of eye care interventions for primary eye care workers, will need to be re-evaluated and re-defined against such evidence or supported by new evidence. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher BioMed Central en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.source Human Resources for Health en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/
dc.subject Ophthalmologist
dc.subject Cataract surgeon
dc.subject Africa
dc.subject Primary eye care
dc.title Setting targets for human resources for eye health in sub-Saharan Africa: what evidence should be used? en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-05-19T09:20:12Z
dc.language.rfc3066 en
dc.rights.holder Courtright et al.
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Ophthalmology en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Courtright, P., Mathenge, W., Kello, A. B., Cook, C., Kalua, K., & Lewallen, S. (2016). Setting targets for human resources for eye health in sub-Saharan Africa: what evidence should be used?. <i>Human Resources for Health</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19797 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Courtright, Paul, Wanjiku Mathenge, Amir B Kello, Colin Cook, Khumbo Kalua, and Susan Lewallen "Setting targets for human resources for eye health in sub-Saharan Africa: what evidence should be used?." <i>Human Resources for Health</i> (2016) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19797 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Courtright P, Mathenge W, Kello AB, Cook C, Kalua K, Lewallen S. Setting targets for human resources for eye health in sub-Saharan Africa: what evidence should be used?. Human Resources for Health. 2016; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19797. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Courtright, Paul AU - Mathenge, Wanjiku AU - Kello, Amir B AU - Cook, Colin AU - Kalua, Khumbo AU - Lewallen, Susan AB - With a global target set at reducing vision loss by 25% by the year 2019, sub-Saharan Africa with an estimated 4.8 million blind persons will require human resources for eye health (HReH) that need to be available, appropriately skilled, supported, and productive. Targets for HReH are useful for planning, monitoring, and resource mobilization, but they need to be updated and informed by evidence of effectiveness and efficiency. Supporting evidence should take into consideration (1) ever-changing disease-specific issues including the epidemiology, the complexity of diagnosis and treatment, and the technology needed for diagnosis and treatment of each condition; (2) the changing demands for vision-related services of an increasingly urbanized population; and (3) interconnected health system issues that affect productivity and quality. The existing targets for HReH and some of the existing strategies such as task shifting of cataract surgery and trichiasis surgery, as well as the scope of eye care interventions for primary eye care workers, will need to be re-evaluated and re-defined against such evidence or supported by new evidence. DA - 2016 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/s12960-016-0107-x DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Human Resources for Health KW - Ophthalmologist KW - Cataract surgeon KW - Africa KW - Primary eye care LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 SM - 1478-4491 T1 - Setting targets for human resources for eye health in sub-Saharan Africa: what evidence should be used? TI - Setting targets for human resources for eye health in sub-Saharan Africa: what evidence should be used? UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19797 ER - en_ZA


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