Making the invisible visible: a systematic review of sexual minority women’s health in Southern Africa

 

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dc.contributor.author Muller, Alexandra
dc.contributor.author Hughes, Tonda L
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-23T12:17:56Z
dc.date.available 2016-05-23T12:17:56Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Muller, A., & Hughes, T. L. (2016). Making the invisible visible: a systematic review of sexual minority women’s health in Southern Africa. BMC Public Health, 16(1), 1. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2458 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-016-2980-6
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19792
dc.description.abstract Background: Over the past two decades research on sexual and gender minority (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender; LGBT) health has highlighted substantial health disparities based on sexual orientation and gender identity in many parts of the world. We systematically reviewed the literature on sexual minority women’s (SMW) health in Southern Africa, with the objective of identifying existing evidence and pointing out knowledge gaps around the health of this vulnerable group in this region. Methods: A systematic review of publications in English, French, Portuguese or German, indexed in PubMed or MEDLINE between the years 2000 and 2015, following PRISMA guidelines. Additional studies were identified by searching bibliographies of identified studies. Search terms included (Lesbian OR bisexual OR “women who have sex with women”), (HIV OR depression OR “substance use” OR “substance abuse” OR “mental health” OR suicide OR anxiety OR cancer), and geographical specification. All empirical studies that used quantitative or qualitative methods, which contributed to evidence for SMW’s health in one, a few or all of the countries, were included. Theoretical and review articles were excluded. Data were extracted independently by 2 researchers using predefined data fields, which included a risk of bias/quality assessment. Results: Of 315 hits, 9 articles were selected for review and a further 6 were identified through bibliography searches. Most studies were conducted with small sample sizes in South Africa and focused on sexual health. SMW included in the studies were racially and socio-economically heterogeneous. Studies focused predominately on young populations, and highlighted substance use and violence as key health issues for SMW in Southern Africa. Conclusions: Although there are large gaps in the literature, the review highlighted substantial sexual-orientationrelated health disparities among women in Southern Africa. The findings have important implications for public health policy and research, highlighting the lack of population-level evidence on the one hand, and the impact of criminalizing laws around homosexuality on the other hand. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher BioMed Central en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.source BMC Public Health en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/
dc.subject Sexual minority health
dc.subject Women’s health
dc.subject Southern Africa
dc.subject Systematic review
dc.title Making the invisible visible: a systematic review of sexual minority women’s health in Southern Africa en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-05-19T09:25:03Z
dc.language.rfc3066 en
dc.rights.holder Muller and Hughes.
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Gender, Health and Justice Unit en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Muller, A., & Hughes, T. L. (2016). Making the invisible visible: a systematic review of sexual minority women’s health in Southern Africa. <i>BMC Public Health</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19792 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Muller, Alexandra, and Tonda L Hughes "Making the invisible visible: a systematic review of sexual minority women’s health in Southern Africa." <i>BMC Public Health</i> (2016) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19792 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Muller A, Hughes TL. Making the invisible visible: a systematic review of sexual minority women’s health in Southern Africa. BMC Public Health. 2016; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19792. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Muller, Alexandra AU - Hughes, Tonda L AB - Background: Over the past two decades research on sexual and gender minority (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender; LGBT) health has highlighted substantial health disparities based on sexual orientation and gender identity in many parts of the world. We systematically reviewed the literature on sexual minority women’s (SMW) health in Southern Africa, with the objective of identifying existing evidence and pointing out knowledge gaps around the health of this vulnerable group in this region. Methods: A systematic review of publications in English, French, Portuguese or German, indexed in PubMed or MEDLINE between the years 2000 and 2015, following PRISMA guidelines. Additional studies were identified by searching bibliographies of identified studies. Search terms included (Lesbian OR bisexual OR “women who have sex with women”), (HIV OR depression OR “substance use” OR “substance abuse” OR “mental health” OR suicide OR anxiety OR cancer), and geographical specification. All empirical studies that used quantitative or qualitative methods, which contributed to evidence for SMW’s health in one, a few or all of the countries, were included. Theoretical and review articles were excluded. Data were extracted independently by 2 researchers using predefined data fields, which included a risk of bias/quality assessment. Results: Of 315 hits, 9 articles were selected for review and a further 6 were identified through bibliography searches. Most studies were conducted with small sample sizes in South Africa and focused on sexual health. SMW included in the studies were racially and socio-economically heterogeneous. Studies focused predominately on young populations, and highlighted substance use and violence as key health issues for SMW in Southern Africa. Conclusions: Although there are large gaps in the literature, the review highlighted substantial sexual-orientationrelated health disparities among women in Southern Africa. The findings have important implications for public health policy and research, highlighting the lack of population-level evidence on the one hand, and the impact of criminalizing laws around homosexuality on the other hand. DA - 2016 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/s12889-016-2980-6 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - BMC Public Health KW - Sexual minority health KW - Women’s health KW - Southern Africa KW - Systematic review LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2016 SM - 1471-2458 T1 - Making the invisible visible: a systematic review of sexual minority women’s health in Southern Africa TI - Making the invisible visible: a systematic review of sexual minority women’s health in Southern Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19792 ER - en_ZA


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