Review of the causes of the rise of the illegal South African abalone fishery and consequent closure of the rights-based fishery

 

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dc.contributor.author Raemaekers, Serge
dc.contributor.author Hauck, Maria
dc.contributor.author Burgener, Markus
dc.contributor.author Mackenzie, Angus
dc.contributor.author Maharaj, Genevieve
dc.contributor.author Plagányi, Éva E
dc.contributor.author Britz, Peter J
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-16T09:55:27Z
dc.date.available 2016-05-16T09:55:27Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2011.02.001
dc.identifier.citation Raemaekers, S., Hauck, M., Bürgener, M., Mackenzie, A., Maharaj, G., Plagányi, É. E., & Britz, P. J. (2011). Review of the causes of the rise of the illegal South African abalone fishery and consequent closure of the rights-based fishery. Ocean & Coastal Management, 54(6), 433-445. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 0964-5691 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19664
dc.description.abstract The rise of organised illegal fishing and trade in abalone from the late 1990s destabilised South Africa’s historically stable, quota-managed fishery, culminating in its closure in 2008. The development of the fishery is described in a historical context, including the evolution of South Africa’s science-based abalone fishery management system. The diverse suite of responses deployed to combat illegal fishing and the black market trade in abalone are reviewed, including;- fishery reform to expand rights to a greater number of previously disadvantaged fishers, a territorial user rights fishery (TURF) system, special compliance operations and courts, the CITES listing of abalone, and the serial reduction in the TAC, culminating in the controversial and legally contested closure of the fishery. The main causes of the rise of the illegal fishery are diagnosed as 1) the massive increase in the abalone price that occurred in the 1990s triggering an abalone fishing “gold-rush” and 2) the failure of the post-Apartheid fishery reform process to accommodate many traditional fishers in a legal fishing rights framework resulting in them operating outside the formal fishery management system. By contextualising the abalone fishery as a complex system, embedded in South Africa’s socio-political setting, we show how the resource focussed fishery management system did not have the capacity to incorporate the powerful social, political and economic drivers determining fisher behaviour. We conclude with the need to revisit South Africa’s abalone fishery management paradigm, and argue that a more integrated governance approach is required that takes into account the biological, socio-political and economic factors determining the fishery activities. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Elsevier en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.source Ocean and Coastal Management en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.journals.elsevier.com/ocean-and-coastal-management/
dc.title Review of the causes of the rise of the illegal South African abalone fishery and consequent closure of the rights-based fishery en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-04-25T10:16:36Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Marine Resource Assessment and Management Group en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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