Democracy, poverty and inclusive growth in South Africa since 1994

 

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dc.contributor.author Seekings, Jeremy
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-26T13:43:01Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-26T13:43:01Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.citation Seekings, J. (2013). Democracy, poverty and inclusive growth in South Africa since 1994. Centre for Social Science Research: University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19241
dc.description.abstract The formal establishment of representative democracy in South Africa provided a weak impetus to effective pro-poor policy-making. Poverty and inequality (of both opportunities and outcomes) have persisted. Political parties want to be seen as being pro-poor, but there is insufficient competition within the electoral system to ensure that the governing party adopts or implements many effective pro-poor policies. The poor have been unable to use their votes to counter the powerful vested interests of the new black elite and middle classes, organised labour, and (unevenly) capital. Progressive technocrats and bureaucrats have implemented a variety of pro-poor reforms - including especially the expansion of social grants - in the face of skepticism among some senior ANC leaders. But many other reforms have been blocked by powerful vested interests (including, in many cases, organized labour). Direct action and social movement organisations have achieved limited pro-poor gains in the delivery of some services, but have had not changed the underlying patterns of distribution and redistribution. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.title Democracy, poverty and inclusive growth in South Africa since 1994 en_ZA
dc.type Working Paper en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-04-26T13:41:41Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Research paper en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Social Science Research(CSSR) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Seekings, J. (2013). <i>Democracy, poverty and inclusive growth in South Africa since 1994</i> University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Social Science Research(CSSR). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19241 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Seekings, Jeremy <i>Democracy, poverty and inclusive growth in South Africa since 1994.</i> University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Social Science Research(CSSR), 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19241 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Seekings J. Democracy, poverty and inclusive growth in South Africa since 1994. 2013 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19241 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Working Paper AU - Seekings, Jeremy AB - The formal establishment of representative democracy in South Africa provided a weak impetus to effective pro-poor policy-making. Poverty and inequality (of both opportunities and outcomes) have persisted. Political parties want to be seen as being pro-poor, but there is insufficient competition within the electoral system to ensure that the governing party adopts or implements many effective pro-poor policies. The poor have been unable to use their votes to counter the powerful vested interests of the new black elite and middle classes, organised labour, and (unevenly) capital. Progressive technocrats and bureaucrats have implemented a variety of pro-poor reforms - including especially the expansion of social grants - in the face of skepticism among some senior ANC leaders. But many other reforms have been blocked by powerful vested interests (including, in many cases, organized labour). Direct action and social movement organisations have achieved limited pro-poor gains in the delivery of some services, but have had not changed the underlying patterns of distribution and redistribution. DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - Democracy, poverty and inclusive growth in South Africa since 1994 TI - Democracy, poverty and inclusive growth in South Africa since 1994 UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19241 ER - en_ZA


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)