Political Communication in Post-Apartheid South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.author Glenn, Ian
dc.contributor.author Mattes, Robert
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-26T11:36:50Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-26T11:36:50Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.citation Glenn, I., & Mattes, R. (2012). Political communication in post-apartheid South Africa. The Sage Handbook of Political Communication. London: Sage Publications. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19224
dc.description.abstract Any politically interested foreigner visiting South Africa from the developed world would see and hear much in the country‟s mass communications infrastructure that would appear familiar. Much of this is due to the country‟s colonial legacy, which shaped both the country‟s media and political models. The oldest newspaper, for example, the Cape Times, as well as the state broadcaster, the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) overtly modeled themselves, (the latter following input from Lord Reith, head of the BBC), on British originals. In the post-apartheid era, the tabloid The Daily Sun pays tribute, in name if not in substance, to the UK‟s leading tabloid. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.title Political Communication in Post-Apartheid South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Working Paper en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-04-26T08:34:13Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Research paper en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Social Science Research(CSSR) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Glenn, I., & Mattes, R. (2011). <i>Political Communication in Post-Apartheid South Africa</i> University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Social Science Research(CSSR). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19224 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Glenn, Ian, and Robert Mattes <i>Political Communication in Post-Apartheid South Africa.</i> University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Social Science Research(CSSR), 2011. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19224 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Glenn I, Mattes R. Political Communication in Post-Apartheid South Africa. 2011 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19224 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Working Paper AU - Glenn, Ian AU - Mattes, Robert AB - Any politically interested foreigner visiting South Africa from the developed world would see and hear much in the country‟s mass communications infrastructure that would appear familiar. Much of this is due to the country‟s colonial legacy, which shaped both the country‟s media and political models. The oldest newspaper, for example, the Cape Times, as well as the state broadcaster, the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) overtly modeled themselves, (the latter following input from Lord Reith, head of the BBC), on British originals. In the post-apartheid era, the tabloid The Daily Sun pays tribute, in name if not in substance, to the UK‟s leading tabloid. DA - 2011 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2011 T1 - Political Communication in Post-Apartheid South Africa TI - Political Communication in Post-Apartheid South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19224 ER - en_ZA


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