Hypertension, chronic kidney disease, atrial fibrillation and the newer anticoagulants

 

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dc.contributor.author Rayner, B L
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-23T12:42:43Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-23T12:42:43Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/20786204.2012.10874263
dc.identifier.citation Rayner, B. (2012). Hypertension, chronic kidney disease, atrial fibrillation and the newer anticoagulants. South African Family Practice, 54(5), 418-419. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 2078-6190 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19155
dc.identifier.uri http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/20786204.2012.10874263
dc.description.abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common clinical condition that is associated with increased morbidity and mortality that mainly relates to an embolic stroke. Dominant risk factors for AF are advanced age and hypertension in the absence of mitral valve disease.1 In turn, hypertension and ageing are determinants of the congestive heart failure, hypertension, age, diabetes mellitus, prior stroke or transient ischaemic attack or thromboembolism (CHADS2) criteria for assessing the indication for anticoagulation. In addition, they are important risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD). In itself, CKD is an independent risk factor for AF and a higher risk of stroke.2 It is highly likely that a practitioner will encounter older patients with AF and concomitant hypertension and CKD that require anticoagulation therapy. Thus, it is essential for the practitioner to understand the risks and benefits of anticoagulation in older patients with AF, hypertension and CKD. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher South African Academy of Family Physicians en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 South Africa License *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/za/ en_ZA
dc.source South African Family Practice en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.safpj.co.za/index.php/safpj
dc.subject.other hypertension
dc.subject.other chronic kidney disease
dc.subject.other atrial fibrillation
dc.subject.other anticoagulants
dc.title Hypertension, chronic kidney disease, atrial fibrillation and the newer anticoagulants en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-04-21T08:39:01Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Nephrology and Hypertension en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Rayner, B. L. (2012). Hypertension, chronic kidney disease, atrial fibrillation and the newer anticoagulants. <i>South African Family Practice</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19155 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Rayner, B L "Hypertension, chronic kidney disease, atrial fibrillation and the newer anticoagulants." <i>South African Family Practice</i> (2012) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19155 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Rayner BL. Hypertension, chronic kidney disease, atrial fibrillation and the newer anticoagulants. South African Family Practice. 2012; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19155. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Rayner, B L AB - Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common clinical condition that is associated with increased morbidity and mortality that mainly relates to an embolic stroke. Dominant risk factors for AF are advanced age and hypertension in the absence of mitral valve disease.1 In turn, hypertension and ageing are determinants of the congestive heart failure, hypertension, age, diabetes mellitus, prior stroke or transient ischaemic attack or thromboembolism (CHADS2) criteria for assessing the indication for anticoagulation. In addition, they are important risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD). In itself, CKD is an independent risk factor for AF and a higher risk of stroke.2 It is highly likely that a practitioner will encounter older patients with AF and concomitant hypertension and CKD that require anticoagulation therapy. Thus, it is essential for the practitioner to understand the risks and benefits of anticoagulation in older patients with AF, hypertension and CKD. DA - 2012 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - South African Family Practice LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2012 SM - 2078-6190 T1 - Hypertension, chronic kidney disease, atrial fibrillation and the newer anticoagulants TI - Hypertension, chronic kidney disease, atrial fibrillation and the newer anticoagulants UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19155 ER - en_ZA


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