Provision of free ARV in public facilities in Tanzania : do the poor benefit?

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Thiede, Michael en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Kahwa, Amos en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-21T09:40:29Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-21T09:40:29Z
dc.date.issued 2007 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Kahwa, A. 2007. Provision of free ARV in public facilities in Tanzania : do the poor benefit?. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19069
dc.description.abstract The impact of the HIV pandemic in Tanzania has been profound and has affected all sectors. Today, HIV/AIDS is recognized not only as a major public health concern but also as social, economic and development problem in Tanzania as in most in Sub-Saharan African countries. With a population of estimated 37 million, Tanzania has an estimated of 2.5 million people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) which has been defined as the main form of treatment (yet not a cure) for HIV/AIDS showed to significantly prolong and improve quality of life of people infected with HIV. By and large, the entire range of antiretroviral drugs is available anywhere in the world through private channels. Where resources permit, the supply may be adequate and consistent. Through the public sector, however, and for low-income patients, the choice of drugs may be somewhat restricted. This has implications for decisions such as when to start therapy, which therapeutic regimens to use, and what to do when treatment fails. The situation requires difficult choices in priority setting, poses serious ethical issues and imposes on government the obligation to scale up programmes in ways that are ethically sound, equitable, beneficial and sustainable as possible (WHO 2004). However in Tanzania, there is no clear policy established on targeting or prioritising specific population groups in order to avoid decision making based on subjective or arbitrary criteria that may lead to discrimination. The aim of this study was to establish the socioeconomic status of those individuals who benefit most from the provision of free ARV in terms of utilisation in urban and rural settings. It also aimed to identify the criteria used in enrolment of patients for free ARV provision, the barriers for ARV provision and patient's perception on ARV. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Health Economics en_ZA
dc.title Provision of free ARV in public facilities in Tanzania : do the poor benefit? en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Health Economics Unit en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MPH en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Kahwa, A. (2007). <i>Provision of free ARV in public facilities in Tanzania : do the poor benefit?</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Health Economics Unit. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19069 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Kahwa, Amos. <i>"Provision of free ARV in public facilities in Tanzania : do the poor benefit?."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Health Economics Unit, 2007. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19069 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Kahwa A. Provision of free ARV in public facilities in Tanzania : do the poor benefit?. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Health Economics Unit, 2007 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19069 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Kahwa, Amos AB - The impact of the HIV pandemic in Tanzania has been profound and has affected all sectors. Today, HIV/AIDS is recognized not only as a major public health concern but also as social, economic and development problem in Tanzania as in most in Sub-Saharan African countries. With a population of estimated 37 million, Tanzania has an estimated of 2.5 million people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) which has been defined as the main form of treatment (yet not a cure) for HIV/AIDS showed to significantly prolong and improve quality of life of people infected with HIV. By and large, the entire range of antiretroviral drugs is available anywhere in the world through private channels. Where resources permit, the supply may be adequate and consistent. Through the public sector, however, and for low-income patients, the choice of drugs may be somewhat restricted. This has implications for decisions such as when to start therapy, which therapeutic regimens to use, and what to do when treatment fails. The situation requires difficult choices in priority setting, poses serious ethical issues and imposes on government the obligation to scale up programmes in ways that are ethically sound, equitable, beneficial and sustainable as possible (WHO 2004). However in Tanzania, there is no clear policy established on targeting or prioritising specific population groups in order to avoid decision making based on subjective or arbitrary criteria that may lead to discrimination. The aim of this study was to establish the socioeconomic status of those individuals who benefit most from the provision of free ARV in terms of utilisation in urban and rural settings. It also aimed to identify the criteria used in enrolment of patients for free ARV provision, the barriers for ARV provision and patient's perception on ARV. DA - 2007 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2007 T1 - Provision of free ARV in public facilities in Tanzania : do the poor benefit? TI - Provision of free ARV in public facilities in Tanzania : do the poor benefit? UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/19069 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record