The early years of black radio broadcasting in South Africa : a critical reflection on the making of Ukhozi FM

 

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dc.contributor.author Mhlambi, Thokozani Ndumiso en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-20T11:10:52Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-20T11:10:52Z
dc.date.issued 2008 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Mhlambi, T. 2008. The early years of black radio broadcasting in South Africa : a critical reflection on the making of Ukhozi FM. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18999
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. . en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The history of black radio in South Africa demonstrates the legacy of colonialism, but also exhibits the performance of novel identities in the 'modem' state. In this dissertation I look at the early years of black radio in South Africa circa 1940-1944, focussing primarily on the Zulu language service. The service was originally broadcasted on the Afrikaans and English radio stations in South Africa. It was 3 minutes in length at its inception in 1940 and was gradually extended to 30 minutes by September of 1942. Based on the collection of archival material and newspaper clippings I look at three colonial figures that were active in the early years of native radio, namely: Hugh Tracey, who was the initiator of broadcasts in Zulu, K. E. Masinga, who presented the first shows in the Zulu service, and The Zulu Radio Choir, who were mentioned as part of the first groups to be recorded for the Zulu radio service (Tracey 1948). All three of these stakeholders have played a foundational role in the establishment of the radio archive in South Africa. Using discourse analysis and Judith Butler's performativity theory (1988; 1990; 1999), I trace the discursive interactions of these stakeholders-an area where 'African tradition' meets 'colonial modernity' (Mudirnbe 1988). I then proceed to show how their performative acts reveal multi-layered processes of redefinition and negotiation. A recurring thread in the entire dissertation is a quest to represent Africa and its people's in new ways that challenge colonial legacies. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Public Culture (African Studies) en_ZA
dc.title The early years of black radio broadcasting in South Africa : a critical reflection on the making of Ukhozi FM en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department African Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MPhil en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Mhlambi, T. N. (2008). <i>The early years of black radio broadcasting in South Africa : a critical reflection on the making of Ukhozi FM</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,African Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18999 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Mhlambi, Thokozani Ndumiso. <i>"The early years of black radio broadcasting in South Africa : a critical reflection on the making of Ukhozi FM."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,African Studies, 2008. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18999 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Mhlambi TN. The early years of black radio broadcasting in South Africa : a critical reflection on the making of Ukhozi FM. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,African Studies, 2008 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18999 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Mhlambi, Thokozani Ndumiso AB - The history of black radio in South Africa demonstrates the legacy of colonialism, but also exhibits the performance of novel identities in the 'modem' state. In this dissertation I look at the early years of black radio in South Africa circa 1940-1944, focussing primarily on the Zulu language service. The service was originally broadcasted on the Afrikaans and English radio stations in South Africa. It was 3 minutes in length at its inception in 1940 and was gradually extended to 30 minutes by September of 1942. Based on the collection of archival material and newspaper clippings I look at three colonial figures that were active in the early years of native radio, namely: Hugh Tracey, who was the initiator of broadcasts in Zulu, K. E. Masinga, who presented the first shows in the Zulu service, and The Zulu Radio Choir, who were mentioned as part of the first groups to be recorded for the Zulu radio service (Tracey 1948). All three of these stakeholders have played a foundational role in the establishment of the radio archive in South Africa. Using discourse analysis and Judith Butler's performativity theory (1988; 1990; 1999), I trace the discursive interactions of these stakeholders-an area where 'African tradition' meets 'colonial modernity' (Mudirnbe 1988). I then proceed to show how their performative acts reveal multi-layered processes of redefinition and negotiation. A recurring thread in the entire dissertation is a quest to represent Africa and its people's in new ways that challenge colonial legacies. DA - 2008 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2008 T1 - The early years of black radio broadcasting in South Africa : a critical reflection on the making of Ukhozi FM TI - The early years of black radio broadcasting in South Africa : a critical reflection on the making of Ukhozi FM UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18999 ER - en_ZA


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