South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.author Schonwetter, Tobias
dc.contributor.author Ncube, Caroline
dc.contributor.author Chetty, Pria
dc.contributor.editor De Beer, J
dc.contributor.editor Armstrong, C
dc.contributor.editor Oguamanam, C
dc.contributor.editor Schonwetter, T
dc.coverage.spatial South Africa en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-14T07:36:21Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-14T07:36:21Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.citation Schonwetter T, Ncube CB and Chetty, P. ‘South Africa’ in C. Armstrong, J. de Beer, D. Kawooya, A. Prabhala and T. Schonwetter (eds), Access to Knowledge in Africa: The Role of Copyright (2010) . Claremont, CPT: UCT Press 231-280. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18902
dc.description.abstract South Africa is the world’s 25th-largest country by surface area, and 24th-largest by population. It is located at the southernmost region of Africa and divided into nine provinces: Limpopo, North West, Gauteng, Mpumalanga, KwaZulu-Natal, Free State, Northern Cape, Western Cape and Eastern Cape. South Africa’s colonial past dates to the 16th century. Slavery was widespread by the 17th century and was not abolished until the mid-19th century. Racial discrimination was rampant during the apartheid era between 1948-94, when South Africa was governed by the National Party. After protracted negotiations, the first democratic elections were held under an Interim Constitution in 1994. This negotiated transition from apartheid to democracy has been hailed as both ‘one of the most astonishing political achievements of our time’ and ‘a miracle’. Since 1994 the government has been led by the African National Congress (ANC), which won democratic elections in 1999, 2004 and 2009. Since 1994 the government has pursued democratisation, socioeconomic change and reconciliation.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Juta en_ZA
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 South Africa (CC BY-NC-SA 2.5 ZA) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/za/ en_ZA
dc.subject copyright en_ZA
dc.subject learning materials en_ZA
dc.subject access en_ZA
dc.subject South Africa en_ZA
dc.title South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Book en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Book chapter en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Law en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Commercial Law en_ZA
dc.publisher.location Cape Town en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Schonwetter, T., Ncube, C., & Chetty, P. (2010). <i>South Africa</i>. Cape Town: Juta. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18902 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Schonwetter, Tobias, Caroline Ncube, and Pria Chetty. <i>South Africa</i>. Cape Town: Juta. 2010. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18902. en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Schonwetter T, Ncube C, Chetty P. South Africa. Cape Town: Juta; 2010.http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18902 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Book AU - Schonwetter, Tobias AU - Ncube, Caroline AU - Chetty, Pria AB - South Africa is the world’s 25th-largest country by surface area, and 24th-largest by population. It is located at the southernmost region of Africa and divided into nine provinces: Limpopo, North West, Gauteng, Mpumalanga, KwaZulu-Natal, Free State, Northern Cape, Western Cape and Eastern Cape. South Africa’s colonial past dates to the 16th century. Slavery was widespread by the 17th century and was not abolished until the mid-19th century. Racial discrimination was rampant during the apartheid era between 1948-94, when South Africa was governed by the National Party. After protracted negotiations, the first democratic elections were held under an Interim Constitution in 1994. This negotiated transition from apartheid to democracy has been hailed as both ‘one of the most astonishing political achievements of our time’ and ‘a miracle’. Since 1994 the government has been led by the African National Congress (ANC), which won democratic elections in 1999, 2004 and 2009. Since 1994 the government has pursued democratisation, socioeconomic change and reconciliation. CY - Cape Town DA - 2010 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town ED - De Beer, J ED - Armstrong, C ED - Oguamanam, C ED - Schonwetter, T KW - copyright KW - learning materials KW - access KW - South Africa LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PP - Cape Town PY - 2010 T1 - South Africa TI - South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18902 ER - en_ZA


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Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 South Africa (CC BY-NC-SA 2.5 ZA) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 South Africa (CC BY-NC-SA 2.5 ZA)