The organisational effects of installing a distributed processing system

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Sulcas, Paul en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Lay, Peter Mark Quine en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-28T14:36:24Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-28T14:36:24Z
dc.date.issued 1980 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Lay, P. 1980. The organisational effects of installing a distributed processing system. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18287
dc.description Bibliography: 238-248. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Since its introduction to business in 1952, computerised data processing has undergone a number of substantial changes, both in the hardware and the techniques that are used. The introduction of miniaturisation, and the resultant lowering of the costs of circuitry, has led to the widespread use of mini- and micro-computers. There has also been a large increase in the use of communication facilities. Initially, almost all organisations centralised their computer facilities at the Head Office and systems were run in the batch mode. The need to service the requirements of remote users was resolved by installing on-line facilities and providing unintelligent terminals to those users. Alternatively, stand-alone computers were installed at the remote locations. However, the requirements of businesses for centralised reporting and control led to the need to install processing units at the user sites and to connect those computers, via communications links, to a computer facility located at Head Office. In this way distributed data processing evolved. The provision of this type of processing mode has important implications to the organisation in such areas as costs, staffing, planning, control and systems design. This thesis, therefore, investigates the current (1980) trends in relation to distributed processing. It specifically examines the developments in hardware, software, and data communications. It assesses the criteria that should be considered by an organisation in selecting either the centralisation or distribution of its processing facilities. Through a field study both successful and unsuccessful distributed installations are examined. Conclusions are then drawn and recommendations made, to provide management with working guidelines when assessing the feasibility and practicality of distributed processing for its organisation. The findings of the study are appropriate for both general management and DP management with only centralised computing experience; and for individuals offering professional computer consultancy services to existing or potential users. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Information systems en_ZA
dc.subject.other electronic data processing en_ZA
dc.title The organisational effects of installing a distributed processing system en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Commerce en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Information Systems en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MCom en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Lay, P. M. Q. (1980). <i>The organisational effects of installing a distributed processing system</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,Department of Information Systems. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18287 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Lay, Peter Mark Quine. <i>"The organisational effects of installing a distributed processing system."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,Department of Information Systems, 1980. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18287 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Lay PMQ. The organisational effects of installing a distributed processing system. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,Department of Information Systems, 1980 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18287 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Lay, Peter Mark Quine AB - Since its introduction to business in 1952, computerised data processing has undergone a number of substantial changes, both in the hardware and the techniques that are used. The introduction of miniaturisation, and the resultant lowering of the costs of circuitry, has led to the widespread use of mini- and micro-computers. There has also been a large increase in the use of communication facilities. Initially, almost all organisations centralised their computer facilities at the Head Office and systems were run in the batch mode. The need to service the requirements of remote users was resolved by installing on-line facilities and providing unintelligent terminals to those users. Alternatively, stand-alone computers were installed at the remote locations. However, the requirements of businesses for centralised reporting and control led to the need to install processing units at the user sites and to connect those computers, via communications links, to a computer facility located at Head Office. In this way distributed data processing evolved. The provision of this type of processing mode has important implications to the organisation in such areas as costs, staffing, planning, control and systems design. This thesis, therefore, investigates the current (1980) trends in relation to distributed processing. It specifically examines the developments in hardware, software, and data communications. It assesses the criteria that should be considered by an organisation in selecting either the centralisation or distribution of its processing facilities. Through a field study both successful and unsuccessful distributed installations are examined. Conclusions are then drawn and recommendations made, to provide management with working guidelines when assessing the feasibility and practicality of distributed processing for its organisation. The findings of the study are appropriate for both general management and DP management with only centralised computing experience; and for individuals offering professional computer consultancy services to existing or potential users. DA - 1980 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1980 T1 - The organisational effects of installing a distributed processing system TI - The organisational effects of installing a distributed processing system UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18287 ER - en_ZA


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