Viewing postmodernist television : Moonlighting, Twin Peaks and The Simpsons

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Bertelsen, Eve en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Baderoon, Gabeba en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-28T14:29:28Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-28T14:29:28Z
dc.date.issued 1995 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Baderoon, G. 1995. Viewing postmodernist television : Moonlighting, Twin Peaks and The Simpsons. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18257
dc.description Summary in English. en_ZA
dc.description Bibliography: p. [181]-195. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Contemporary life is distinguished by a massive capacity for exchanging information. Increasingly comprehensive, global communication networks allow discrete realities to be linked. These prolific sources of representation generate a "membrane" of mediation, and a formal regime of fragmentation, depthlessness and allusiveness (Chambers, 11). These economic, epistemological and aesthetic conditions constitute postmodernism. This dissertation addresses the theoretical challenge of form by attempting to craft an approach commensurate to such semiotic density (Wollen, 65). Since formalist approaches have been criticised as ahistorical, attention is given to the concept's social dimensions hence the history and production context of communication technology is considered. The inquiry also acknowledges the specificities of its location. The matrix of unfamiliar allusions which characterises the South African experience of American texts, embodies the multi-tiered allusiveness of postmodernist texts. It also illustrates the cult precept that quotation can be appreciated even when its source is not recognized. Cult theorises viewership as active yet ambivalent (Eco, 1988, 454). The initial chapter delineates parameters in postmodernism, narrative, genre and cult theory. Subsequent chapters examine three postmodernist television series: Moonlighting, a detective series, Twin Peaks, a soap opera, and The Simpsons, an animated sitcom. Deploying parody, self-reflexivity and intertextuality, each has a complex relation with genre. Tony Bennett conceives of the latter as zones of sociality which constitute and are constituted by other zones (105). Changes in genre therefore articulate changes in modes of thinking and inscribe different reading strategies. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Literary Studies en_ZA
dc.title Viewing postmodernist television : Moonlighting, Twin Peaks and The Simpsons en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of English Language and Literature en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Baderoon, G. (1995). <i>Viewing postmodernist television : Moonlighting, Twin Peaks and The Simpsons</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of English Language and Literature. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18257 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Baderoon, Gabeba. <i>"Viewing postmodernist television : Moonlighting, Twin Peaks and The Simpsons."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of English Language and Literature, 1995. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18257 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Baderoon G. Viewing postmodernist television : Moonlighting, Twin Peaks and The Simpsons. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of English Language and Literature, 1995 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18257 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Baderoon, Gabeba AB - Contemporary life is distinguished by a massive capacity for exchanging information. Increasingly comprehensive, global communication networks allow discrete realities to be linked. These prolific sources of representation generate a "membrane" of mediation, and a formal regime of fragmentation, depthlessness and allusiveness (Chambers, 11). These economic, epistemological and aesthetic conditions constitute postmodernism. This dissertation addresses the theoretical challenge of form by attempting to craft an approach commensurate to such semiotic density (Wollen, 65). Since formalist approaches have been criticised as ahistorical, attention is given to the concept's social dimensions hence the history and production context of communication technology is considered. The inquiry also acknowledges the specificities of its location. The matrix of unfamiliar allusions which characterises the South African experience of American texts, embodies the multi-tiered allusiveness of postmodernist texts. It also illustrates the cult precept that quotation can be appreciated even when its source is not recognized. Cult theorises viewership as active yet ambivalent (Eco, 1988, 454). The initial chapter delineates parameters in postmodernism, narrative, genre and cult theory. Subsequent chapters examine three postmodernist television series: Moonlighting, a detective series, Twin Peaks, a soap opera, and The Simpsons, an animated sitcom. Deploying parody, self-reflexivity and intertextuality, each has a complex relation with genre. Tony Bennett conceives of the latter as zones of sociality which constitute and are constituted by other zones (105). Changes in genre therefore articulate changes in modes of thinking and inscribe different reading strategies. DA - 1995 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1995 T1 - Viewing postmodernist television : Moonlighting, Twin Peaks and The Simpsons TI - Viewing postmodernist television : Moonlighting, Twin Peaks and The Simpsons UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18257 ER - en_ZA


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