Green infrastructure: urban water management framework for Paarden Eiland, Cape Town

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Odendaal, Nancy en_ZA
dc.contributor.author De Almeida, Palmira Ndeshihala en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-23T11:49:22Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-23T11:49:22Z
dc.date.issued 2015 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation De Almeida, P. 2015. Green infrastructure: urban water management framework for Paarden Eiland, Cape Town. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18200
dc.description Includes bibliographical references en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Cities in South Africa are currently experiencing rapid urbanisation, especially Cape Town. Infrastructure development has long been a critical component with a large amount of money invested in the development of hard infrastructure. However, in light of excessive stormwater runoff, the increased deterioration of surface water resources, degraded water quality, and the rapid progression of climate change around the global, many cities including Cape Town have progressed towards more sustainable forms of infrastructure development. Discourse surrounding sustainable development often encourages the improvement of the quality of urban areas without compromising the carrying capacity of ecosystems. This is a fairly new model in South Africa, which challenges the underlying principles of conventional infrastructural design and management. There is particularly an enthusiastic interest in the promotion of green infrastructure as a water sensitive design strategy in the management of stormwater and surface water. Presently, drainage systems for urban areas in Cape Town are constructed using principles of hard infrastructure, which often consist of complex man-made networks of underground tunnels and pipes that gather and direct stormwater runoff towards a surface waterbody. However, the extensive development of drainage infrastructure has led to increased stormwater runoff volumes, flooding, and flows. Urban stormwater runoff is known to be one of main sources of pollution and degradation of waterbodies, which has in turn resulted in the degradation of other environmental assets. Therefore, the planning, design, and implementation of infrastructural solutions there is a need to move towards a more sustainable and water sensitive model, in order to remediate these problems. Green infrastructure in this respect offers an opportunity to better manage both stormwater and surface water in a more holistic, cost-effective, efficient and ecological sound manner. The main objective of green infrastructure urban water management is to mimicking the natural hydrological cycle through various stormwater management interventions, in order to achieve what conventional drainage systems currently do and beyond their existing capacity. This dissertation uses Paarden Eiland as a case study and experimental project site in order to assess and investigate how green infrastructure can be utilised to effectively manage stormwater runoff and surface water within a heavily developed urban area. It explores the potential benefits this method of management provides in comparison to a conventional infrastructural approach of management. This study also highlights some of the critical issues and barriers that urban practitioners need to take into account when implementing such systems. A green infrastructure urban water management framework and conceptual layout are presented in order to demonstrate potential green infrastructure tools and strategies that may be used in retrofitting heavily developed areas, as well as provide guidance on how spatial planning can be utilised as a tool in the planning, design, and implementation of green infrastructure as well as in overcoming identified financial, technical, and institutional barriers. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other City and Regional Planning en_ZA
dc.title Green infrastructure: urban water management framework for Paarden Eiland, Cape Town en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MCRP en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation De Almeida, P. N. (2015). <i>Green infrastructure: urban water management framework for Paarden Eiland, Cape Town</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18200 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation De Almeida, Palmira Ndeshihala. <i>"Green infrastructure: urban water management framework for Paarden Eiland, Cape Town."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics, 2015. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18200 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation De Almeida PN. Green infrastructure: urban water management framework for Paarden Eiland, Cape Town. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics, 2015 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18200 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - De Almeida, Palmira Ndeshihala AB - Cities in South Africa are currently experiencing rapid urbanisation, especially Cape Town. Infrastructure development has long been a critical component with a large amount of money invested in the development of hard infrastructure. However, in light of excessive stormwater runoff, the increased deterioration of surface water resources, degraded water quality, and the rapid progression of climate change around the global, many cities including Cape Town have progressed towards more sustainable forms of infrastructure development. Discourse surrounding sustainable development often encourages the improvement of the quality of urban areas without compromising the carrying capacity of ecosystems. This is a fairly new model in South Africa, which challenges the underlying principles of conventional infrastructural design and management. There is particularly an enthusiastic interest in the promotion of green infrastructure as a water sensitive design strategy in the management of stormwater and surface water. Presently, drainage systems for urban areas in Cape Town are constructed using principles of hard infrastructure, which often consist of complex man-made networks of underground tunnels and pipes that gather and direct stormwater runoff towards a surface waterbody. However, the extensive development of drainage infrastructure has led to increased stormwater runoff volumes, flooding, and flows. Urban stormwater runoff is known to be one of main sources of pollution and degradation of waterbodies, which has in turn resulted in the degradation of other environmental assets. Therefore, the planning, design, and implementation of infrastructural solutions there is a need to move towards a more sustainable and water sensitive model, in order to remediate these problems. Green infrastructure in this respect offers an opportunity to better manage both stormwater and surface water in a more holistic, cost-effective, efficient and ecological sound manner. The main objective of green infrastructure urban water management is to mimicking the natural hydrological cycle through various stormwater management interventions, in order to achieve what conventional drainage systems currently do and beyond their existing capacity. This dissertation uses Paarden Eiland as a case study and experimental project site in order to assess and investigate how green infrastructure can be utilised to effectively manage stormwater runoff and surface water within a heavily developed urban area. It explores the potential benefits this method of management provides in comparison to a conventional infrastructural approach of management. This study also highlights some of the critical issues and barriers that urban practitioners need to take into account when implementing such systems. A green infrastructure urban water management framework and conceptual layout are presented in order to demonstrate potential green infrastructure tools and strategies that may be used in retrofitting heavily developed areas, as well as provide guidance on how spatial planning can be utilised as a tool in the planning, design, and implementation of green infrastructure as well as in overcoming identified financial, technical, and institutional barriers. DA - 2015 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2015 T1 - Green infrastructure: urban water management framework for Paarden Eiland, Cape Town TI - Green infrastructure: urban water management framework for Paarden Eiland, Cape Town UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18200 ER - en_ZA


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