Wave and tidal power review

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Kilner, F A en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Kok, Nicolaas Johannes en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-21T19:04:19Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-21T19:04:19Z
dc.date.issued 1978 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Kok, N. 1978. Wave and tidal power review. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18025
dc.description.abstract A review of the technology of useful conversion of wave power and tidal power is presented. These two power resources are reviewed separately, but on the same basis: principles of operation, existing devices or plants and research and development. Promising wave power devices in Britain, the United States and Europe are discussed. If wave power is to be competitive, one of the first requirements may be energy densification. Proposed energy densification schemes include resonance, high pressure water and wave focussing. Wave focussing is a Norwegian invention, technically feasible, and although more research and development is required, it appears to be more promising than alternative forms of wave power utilisation. According to a preliminary cost analysis, it could be competitive with conventional hydro-electric power. The large scale exploitation of tidal power has been considered seriously for about half a century; the literature on the topic is voluminous. The main limitations of tidal power are its intermittent nature and the high costs involved in the construction of a plant. The existing pilot plants at the Rance and Kislaya Guba have respectively proved that tidal power is technically feasible and that construction costs could be reduced. With the rapid increase in the price of fossil fuels, tidal power plants may be realised at the two best sites in the world, the Bay of Fundy and the Severn Estuary. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Civil Engineering en_ZA
dc.subject.other Tidal power generation en_ZA
dc.title Wave and tidal power review en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Department of Civil Engineering en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc (Eng) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Kok, N. J. (1978). <i>Wave and tidal power review</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18025 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Kok, Nicolaas Johannes. <i>"Wave and tidal power review."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering, 1978. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18025 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Kok NJ. Wave and tidal power review. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering, 1978 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18025 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Kok, Nicolaas Johannes AB - A review of the technology of useful conversion of wave power and tidal power is presented. These two power resources are reviewed separately, but on the same basis: principles of operation, existing devices or plants and research and development. Promising wave power devices in Britain, the United States and Europe are discussed. If wave power is to be competitive, one of the first requirements may be energy densification. Proposed energy densification schemes include resonance, high pressure water and wave focussing. Wave focussing is a Norwegian invention, technically feasible, and although more research and development is required, it appears to be more promising than alternative forms of wave power utilisation. According to a preliminary cost analysis, it could be competitive with conventional hydro-electric power. The large scale exploitation of tidal power has been considered seriously for about half a century; the literature on the topic is voluminous. The main limitations of tidal power are its intermittent nature and the high costs involved in the construction of a plant. The existing pilot plants at the Rance and Kislaya Guba have respectively proved that tidal power is technically feasible and that construction costs could be reduced. With the rapid increase in the price of fossil fuels, tidal power plants may be realised at the two best sites in the world, the Bay of Fundy and the Severn Estuary. DA - 1978 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1978 T1 - Wave and tidal power review TI - Wave and tidal power review UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/18025 ER - en_ZA


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