The struggle for the city : alcohol, the ematsheni and popular culture in Durban, 1902-1936

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Webb, Colin en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Harries, Patrick en_ZA
dc.contributor.author La Hausse, Paul en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-17T07:14:46Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-17T07:14:46Z
dc.date.issued 1984 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation La Hausse, P. 1984. The struggle for the city : alcohol, the ematsheni and popular culture in Durban, 1902-1936. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17888
dc.description Bibliography: pages 337-373. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This thesis concerns itself with the genesis and development of the Durban system but also provides a point of entry into the social history of Durban. There are a number of threads which hold this study together. The most central of these comprises an examination of those struggles between ordinary African people and the white rulers of the town over access to, and the production of drink generally, and utshwala in particular. The lengths to which the state in South Africa has gone in order to control the supply of alcohol, particularly utshwala, to African popular classes and the intensity of the resistance to this control has, with one notable exception, been largely ignored by historians. This neglect is understandable. Not only is the study of the making of South Africa's working classes in its infancy but regional social histories have only recently begun to make their appearance in written form. Moreover, research has tended to focus on the Transvaal, especially the Witwatersrand, and the main concern of such studies has been to concentrate on the regional with a view to arriving at more general conclusions about the state and the nature of class formation and consciousness. In their sensitivity to local-level and regional concerns, these studies are invaluable and certainly they represent an important step away from, as Tim Keegan has noted, the growing sterility of the debates on race and class, on segregationist ideology and practice, and on the nature and role of the state. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Alcohol - Law and legislation - South Africa - Durban en_ZA
dc.subject.other East Indians - Alcohol use - South Africa - Durban - History en_ZA
dc.title The struggle for the city : alcohol, the ematsheni and popular culture in Durban, 1902-1936 en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Historical Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation La Hausse, P. (1984). <i>The struggle for the city : alcohol, the ematsheni and popular culture in Durban, 1902-1936</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17888 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation La Hausse, Paul. <i>"The struggle for the city : alcohol, the ematsheni and popular culture in Durban, 1902-1936."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies, 1984. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17888 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation La Hausse P. The struggle for the city : alcohol, the ematsheni and popular culture in Durban, 1902-1936. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies, 1984 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17888 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - La Hausse, Paul AB - This thesis concerns itself with the genesis and development of the Durban system but also provides a point of entry into the social history of Durban. There are a number of threads which hold this study together. The most central of these comprises an examination of those struggles between ordinary African people and the white rulers of the town over access to, and the production of drink generally, and utshwala in particular. The lengths to which the state in South Africa has gone in order to control the supply of alcohol, particularly utshwala, to African popular classes and the intensity of the resistance to this control has, with one notable exception, been largely ignored by historians. This neglect is understandable. Not only is the study of the making of South Africa's working classes in its infancy but regional social histories have only recently begun to make their appearance in written form. Moreover, research has tended to focus on the Transvaal, especially the Witwatersrand, and the main concern of such studies has been to concentrate on the regional with a view to arriving at more general conclusions about the state and the nature of class formation and consciousness. In their sensitivity to local-level and regional concerns, these studies are invaluable and certainly they represent an important step away from, as Tim Keegan has noted, the growing sterility of the debates on race and class, on segregationist ideology and practice, and on the nature and role of the state. DA - 1984 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1984 T1 - The struggle for the city : alcohol, the ematsheni and popular culture in Durban, 1902-1936 TI - The struggle for the city : alcohol, the ematsheni and popular culture in Durban, 1902-1936 UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17888 ER - en_ZA


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