The conciliation movement in the Cape Colony during the Anglo-Boer War, 1899-1902

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Davey, A M en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Botma, Trudé en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-14T07:17:56Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-14T07:17:56Z
dc.date.issued 1974 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Botma, T. 1974. The conciliation movement in the Cape Colony during the Anglo-Boer War, 1899-1902. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17717
dc.description.abstract The conciliation movement at the Cape was largely the offshoot of a parent body in England. This factor tempts the researcher to compare the one with the other, a practice which produces the most frustrating results. Unlike their English counterparts, the conciliators at the Cape did not form a clearly defined, centrally directed, organisation. They were, on the contrary, members of a loosely knit alliance of like-minded persons. Although the movement resulted from the stimulus of a number of leading figures, it had a large and varied supporting cast and there were even individuals who were not formally associated with it who played a leading role in its activities. The term conciliation movement therefore covers a very wide range and there is a voluminous amount of material available in connection with it. There are, however, also the most tantalising lacunae in the available information. In dealing with the conciliation movement I have attempted to concentrate on the activities of its English-speaking associates, as it was they who gave it its essence, but as it drew the bulk of its support from the Dutch section of the colonists their activities cannot be ignored. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Historical Studies en_ZA
dc.title The conciliation movement in the Cape Colony during the Anglo-Boer War, 1899-1902 en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Historical Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Botma, T. (1974). <i>The conciliation movement in the Cape Colony during the Anglo-Boer War, 1899-1902</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17717 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Botma, Trudé. <i>"The conciliation movement in the Cape Colony during the Anglo-Boer War, 1899-1902."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies, 1974. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17717 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Botma T. The conciliation movement in the Cape Colony during the Anglo-Boer War, 1899-1902. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies, 1974 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17717 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Botma, Trudé AB - The conciliation movement at the Cape was largely the offshoot of a parent body in England. This factor tempts the researcher to compare the one with the other, a practice which produces the most frustrating results. Unlike their English counterparts, the conciliators at the Cape did not form a clearly defined, centrally directed, organisation. They were, on the contrary, members of a loosely knit alliance of like-minded persons. Although the movement resulted from the stimulus of a number of leading figures, it had a large and varied supporting cast and there were even individuals who were not formally associated with it who played a leading role in its activities. The term conciliation movement therefore covers a very wide range and there is a voluminous amount of material available in connection with it. There are, however, also the most tantalising lacunae in the available information. In dealing with the conciliation movement I have attempted to concentrate on the activities of its English-speaking associates, as it was they who gave it its essence, but as it drew the bulk of its support from the Dutch section of the colonists their activities cannot be ignored. DA - 1974 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1974 T1 - The conciliation movement in the Cape Colony during the Anglo-Boer War, 1899-1902 TI - The conciliation movement in the Cape Colony during the Anglo-Boer War, 1899-1902 UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17717 ER - en_ZA


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